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March 5, 2019 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

What is Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)? 5 (1)

What is Follicle Stimulating Hormone

What is Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), is one of the gonadotrophic hormones, and the other being a Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The pituitary gland releases both into the bloodstream and body, and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is one of the hormones essential for the development function of women’s ovaries and men’s testes. In women, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) stimulates the growth in the ovary before the release of an egg from one follicle to the ovulation. It also increases estradiol production. In men, Stimulating Follicle Hormone (FSH) acts on the Sertoli cells of the testes to stimulate sperm production (spermatogenesis).

How is Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) control?

The release of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is regulated by the levels of some circulating hormones released by the ovaries and testes. This system is called the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone is published in the hypothalamus and the receptors in the anterior pituitary gland to stimulate both the synthesis release of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The released Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is carried in the bloodstream, where it binds to receptors in the testes and the ovaries. Using this mechanism Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), along with Luteinizing Hormone (LH), can control the functions of the ovaries and testes.

follicle stimulating hormone

In women, when hormone levels are deficient, and it has complication the menstrual cycle, this is sensed by nerve cells in the hypothalamus. These cells produce the more gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, which in turn stimulates the pituitary gland to produce more Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH), and release these into the bloodstream. The rise in Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and stimulates the growth of the follicle in the ovary, and the cells of the follicles produce increasing amounts of estradiol. In turn, this production of these hormones is sensed by the hypothalamus, and pituitary gland and less gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) will be released, However, as the follicle grows, and more and more estrogen is produced from the follicles, it simulates a surge in luteinizing hormone (LH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), which stimulates the released egg from a mature follicle – ovary.

During women menstrual cycle, there is a rise the Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) secretion in the first half of the period and stimulates follicular growth in the ovary, after ovulation, each month the ruptured follicle forms and Corpus luteum that produces high levels of progesterone. This inhibits the release of stimulating Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), and towards the end of the cycle the Corpus luteum breaks down, and progesterone production decreases. The next menstrual period begins when Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) starts the production again, and get back to normal…

follicle stimulating hormone

Now In men, the production of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is regulated by levels of testosterone and inhibin, both produced by the testes. Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) regulates testosterone levels and when this rise they are sensed by nerve cells in the hypothalamus so that gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and consequently Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is decreased. The opposite occurs when testosterone levels drop. This is known as a ‘Negative Feedback in the body’ control so that the production of testosterone remains steady. But the sensed by cells in the anterior pituitary gland rather than the hypothalamus.

What happens if you have too much Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)?

Most often, and raised levels of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) are a sign of malfunction in the ovary or testis. If the gonads fail to create enough estrogen, testosterone and inhibit, the right feedback control of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) production from the pituitary gland is lost, and the levels of both Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) will rise. This condition is called hypogonadotropic-hypogonadism and is associated with primary ovarian failure or testicular failure. This is seen in states such as Klinefelter’s syndrome in men and Turner syndrome in women.

In women, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) levels also start to rise naturally in women around the menopausal period, reflecting a reduction in the function of the ovaries and decline of estrogen and progesterone production.

There are rare pituitary conditions that can raise the levels of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in the bloodstream. This overwhelms the regular negative feedback and can cause ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in women ovaries.

Symptoms: This includes enlarging of the ovaries and potentially dangerous accumulation of fluid in the abdomen, and triggered the rise in ovarian steroid output. Which leads to pain and other problems in the pelvic area of the body.

What happens if don’t produce enough Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)?

In women, lack of Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) leads to incomplete development in puberty o poor ovarian function (ovarian failure), and In this situation ovarian follicles do not grow properly and do not release in the egg, thus leading to infertility. Since levels of Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) in the bloodstream are low, this condition is called hypogonadotropic-hypogonadism. This condition is called Kallman’s syndrome, which is associated with a reduced sense of smell.

Sufficient Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH), this action is also needed for proper sperm production in men, in case of complete absence of Follicle Stimulating in men, and the lack of puberty and infertility due no production of sperm is called (azoospermia). Partial Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) deficiency in young men, can also cause delayed puberty and low sperm production, called (oligozoospermia), but fathering a child may still be possible. Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) occurs after puberty; there will be a similar loss of fertility…

March 4, 2019 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

What is Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and Testosterone 5 (1)

What is Luteinizing Hormone &
The Productions of Testosterone

If you google the word Luteinizing Hormone or (LH), most of the articles you will find talks about the role of luteinizing hormone in women. There is very no info about the part of Luteinizing Hormone in men. While it may seem like a female hormone due to its role in ovulation, a surge of Luteinizing Hormone is a trigger that causes the ovary to release the egg, in the body. If you’ve been trying to conceive or have a baby your wife, significant other may be monitoring her Luteinizing Hormone levels. If she has trouble with ovulation, your doctor may prescribe medications that help with ovulation.

Many of this medication help stimulate the body to produce more Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and its cousin hormone, Stimulating Follicle Hormone (FSH). If you are not trying to conceive, or get pregnant, she may be on hormonal birth control pills. These pills prevent ovulation by blocking Stimulating Follicle Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone. It is one of the manliest hormones in your body. You can think of Luteinizing Hormone as a tiny drill sergeant that commands the Leydig Cells in the testicle to produce testosterone. When Luteinizing Hormone is present, the Leydig Cells generate Testosterone, when it is not, they don’t. Luteinizing Hormone is commander and chief of your Testosterone and critically crucial for sperm production count, muscle building, and overall sexual health.

Male hormones have a clinical nature to them. Luteinizing Hormone (LH) signals the testicle to produce Testosterone. Testosterone seeps out of the testis and into the bloodstream, where it circulates the body and put to good use. Manly things like growing chest hair, increase muscle and your voice deep are some of the effects.

Luteinizing Hormone or (LH)

The brain monitors the blood testosterone levels;

  • If they drop too low, it will send a signal to the pituitary gland to send out more Luteinizing Hormone (LH) to kick start testosterone production.
  • If your testosterone is chronically low (as in the case with hypogonadism or Low Testosterone), the brain will respond by increasing the level of Luteinizing Hormone (LH).
  • If testosterone is chronically higher (as in the case with using testosterone therapy, other performance enhancers or steroids), the brain will shut down production of Luteinizing Hormone (LH). When testosterone therapy is stopped, without post-therapy, men can experience a “crash” as Testosterone levels plummet, but with a post-therapy, the brain lags in re-starting the machinery to generate Luteinizing Hormone.

Getting Tested:

To measure Luteinizing Hormone (LH) levels, you will need to get blood work in a hormone clinic done. Because, doctors will order blood to estimate a panel of hormones which usually includes Stimulating Follicle Hormone, Luteinizing Hormone, Testosterone, Estrogen and They may also add Estrodial, Prolactin which will provide additional information into the insight into your hormonal health and a physical to know your body composition.

In a typical day, Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and Testosterone levels cycle from high to low. When getting blood work done to measure hormone levels, it is important to note the time of day that the analysis was performed to understand the values better.

Testosterone naturally will peak first thing in the morning (partially responsible for morning “wood”). For this reason, doctors prefer to regulate hormones between 8-10am to get a snapshot of your hormone panel profile when Testosterone level is likely to be highest.

When preparing for a Luteinizing Hormone test and to sure your doctor is aware of a few things like:

  • Current Prescription Taking: Current or past use of testosterone therapy. (If you are using anything at the gym or in supplements stores and you aren’t quite sure), you should bring it with your doctor about the appointment.
  • The Use Of Marijuana or THC: It may decrease the number of hormones levels, including Luteinizing Hormone.
  • Medical Radioactive Tracer: This can interfere with the test
  • Normal levels Luteinizing Hormone Range For Adult Males: 1–10 mIU/mL.

They are different labs report different reference ranges, and based on the exact way that they perform the blood work test. From a review of various lab reports, Values lower than 1.0 or higher than 10.0 typically indicate some problem.

For average men, Luteinizing Hormone (LH) typically falls somewhere between 4-7mIU/mL with drops and surges (about 6) throughout the day. Values below 4 and above seven may be considered borderline, and are useful to look at when compared to other hormones, particularly Testosterone and Prolactin.

In the studies that we have reviewed and found that these types of conditions have shown, and can significant drops in testosterone levels and minimal effect in Luteinizing Hormone (LH). Occasionally, Luteinizing Hormone may show up a little low, but often it is entirely in the normal range.

Therefore, low testosterone levels accompanied with normal Luteinizing Hormone (LH) levels often indicate the cause of Low Testosterone can tremendously help to diagnose the condition and also help to create a game plan for treating the cause while managing symptoms of low Testosterone.untitled-design-16

Whats the Causes of high Luteinizing Hormone in Men?

If Luteinizing Hormone (LH) is high and testosterone is low. Then some damage is causing the testicle, or the pituitary gland is trying to compensate by going into overdrive and flooding the balls. With extra Luteinizing Hormone in hopes that it will encourage higher Testosterone production. In cases like this, Luteinizing Hormone levels are often off the charts high sometimes double or triple the average values.

Common causes for this include:

  • Chromosome Abnormalities: Such as Klinefelter’s syndrome
  • Childhood Problems: Such as testicle or testicular torsion, The injury that causes significant damage to testicular tissue
  • Viral Infection: (most commonly mumps) that damages the testis.
  • Radiation exposure or chemotherapy
  • Testicular cancer
  • Borderline High Luteinizing Hormone (LH) levels

Medications or untreated autoimmune disorders can cause slightly elevated Luteinizing Hormone (LH) levels (8.0 – 10.0 range). Some studies have linked Celiac’s Disease with elevated somewhat Luteinizing Hormone (LH). Men with the untreated disease can have moderately high Luteinizing Hormone levels, that usually return to normal upon starting a gluten-free diet.

What causes low Luteinizing Hormone in Men?

The most common reason for Luteinizing Hormone deficiency in men is the use of external androgens (testosterone, other performance enhancers or non-medication). External androgens can trick the brain into thinking the body is producing naturally high levels of testosterone which low down production of luteinizing hormone (LH) and consequently natural testosterone production.

The second most common cause of low Luteinizing Hormone (LH) levels is a health issue, and can directly impact the function of the pituitary in the brain, Most common causes of the pituitary malfunction can include genetic conditions, such as Prader-Willi Syndrome or Kallman’s Syndrome and can cause other problems like:

  • Pituitary tumors (cancerous and benign)
  • Hyperprolactinemia
  • Head trauma
  • Various Medications
  • Auto-immune disorders
  • Borderline low Luteinizing Hormone (LH) results

Luteinizing Hormone levels in the 1.0 – some things can cause 3.0 range. Like, reduce temporarily imbalance hormones: such as overtraining, endurance. They are significantly under or overweight Alcohol consumption spikes in insulin medications or other drugs. High-stress Chronic conditions: that can cause hormone imbalance: such as diabetes, insulin resistance, various auto-immune disorders and can create borderline or low levels of Luteinizing Hormone (LH).