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December 15, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 2 Comments

The Symptoms of Low Thyroid Hormones 0 (0)

The Role of Thyroid Hormones

Thyroid hormones play critical roles throughout the body, including:

  • Increasing or decreasing the heart rate
  • Raising or lowering body temperature
  • Regulating the caloric burn rate to influence weight gain or loss
  • Regulating muscle contraction
  • Controlling how quickly dying cells are replaced
  • Increasing or decreasing the body temperature

This means that maintaining levels in the normal range is critical for a healthy metabolism. Unfortunately, an underactive thyroid gland frequently results in low hormone levels (known medically as hypothyroidism), particularly in women in their 30s and 40s.

What are Normal Hormone Levels?

Low hormone levels or an underactive thyroid is diagnosed using blood tests either in response to symptoms of clinical or hypothyroidism or as part of routine preventative healthcare checks.

Three hormones are usually included in thyroid function tests: Thyroid, triiodothyronine (T3), its prohormone thyroxine (T4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, which regulates the production of T3 and T4 from the thyroid gland). T4 is main circulating hormone; it gets converted into T3 in target tissues by enzymes named deiodinases. Tests measure the levels of both free and total proteins because free hormones are considered to be bioavailable [1]. Regular thyroid function tests are particularly important in individuals receiving testosterone-based hormone-replacement therapy Since some long term users have reduced thyroid function and hypothyroidism [2].

The normal and reference ranges used by Quest Diagnostics for T3, T4, and TSH are shown below.

Test Normal Serum Concentrations
Total T4 5.6 to 13.7 ng/dL
>Free T4 0.8 to 2.7 ng/dL
TSH 0.4 to 4.2 mU/L
Total T3 76 to 181 ng/dL
Free T3 2.3 to 4.2 pg/mL

Symptoms of Low Thyroid Hormones

The common symptoms of hypothyroidism, many of which are the result of a slow metabolism, are as follows:

thyroid

It Thyroid is important to note that not all patients who experience these symptoms and have an underactive thyroids have circulating levels outside the normal range. Unfortunately, many physicians do not treat these patients as they would a patient with overt hypothyroidism. This does not mean that you have to suffer through your symptoms. Anti-aging clinics such as AAI Clinics work with you to ensure that you reach a hormone balance that works best for you to alleviate these symptoms.

References

[1] K.A. Iwen, E. Schröder, G. Brabant, Thyroids Hormones, and the Metabolic Syndrome, European Thyroids Journal, 2 (2013) 83-92.

[2] M. Alen, P. Rahkila, M. Reinila, R. Vihko, Androgenic-anabolic steroid effects on serum thyroids, pituitary and steroid hormones in athletes, The American journal of sports medicine, 15 (1987) 357-361.

pile of food
December 6, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 6 Comments

The Links Between Your Hormones and Diet 0 (0)

Hormone and Diet

Hormone and Diet, We all know that hormone levels decline as we age. Although this is part of normal aging, there are several ways lifestyle decisions that you can make to improve your health and optimize your hormone levels. In the first article in this series, we described the importance of exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. This week, we discuss how your diet can affect your Hormone and Diet levels and reduce the symptoms of aging-related diseases.

The Effects of Dysregulated Hormone Levels and How to Fix Them

Several Hormone and Diet are important for maintaining a healthy metabolism and immune system, and allowing levels to fall too low or climb too high has a series of negative consequences. However, there are many natural ways to alter hormone levels without resorting to pharmaceuticals.

The problem: Estrogen is critical for female fertility and reproduction. When levels fall too low, it results in symptoms such as low libido, and altered menstrual cycle, mood swings, and depression.

The dietary solution: Although estrogen cannot be obtained from the diet, phytoestrogens are a family of compounds found in a number of foods. They exhibit weak estrogen-like effects. Good sources of phytoestrogens are soy and flaxseed. For example, the isoflavones (a type of phytoestrogen) in soy were reported to reduce the symptoms and improve the health and quality of life of postmenopausal women [1]. Of course, too much soy can lead to unwanted estrogen-like effects so it is important to consume in moderation.

Hormone and Diet , soy foods

The problem: Testosterone is the primary male sex Hormone and Diet. Low testosterone levels lead to an increased fat mass, a reduced muscle mass, erectile dysfunction, low libido, fatigue, and depression.

The dietary solution: A number of dietary supplements have been linked to increased testosterone levels. For example, low vitamin D levels are associated with hypogonadism, and increasing vitamin D levels could increase testosterone levels [2]. Vitamin D-rich foods include fatty fish such as tuna and salmon, egg yolks, beef liver, and vitamin D-fortified foods including milk and cereals.

vitamin d foods

The problem: Insulin is a critical metabolic hormone that regulates fat, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism and promotes the absorption of glucose from the circulation into muscle, fat, and the liver. Insulin levels that are too high lead to hyperinsulinemia, which is the cause of a number of metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Conversely, hypoinsulinemia, or low insulin levels, can lead to weight gain, poor concentration, fatigue, and a lack of motivation.

The dietary solution: The best way to prevent insulin-related symptoms is to reduce your risk of insulin resistance. This includes not consuming excess calories and selecting complex carbohydrates. For example, avoid refined products such as white bread and pasta, and instead select whole grain breads, beans, bran, lentils, vegetables, and oats.

good carbs

The problem: Cortisol is a stress Hormone secreted by the adrenal glands; it plays a key role in the fight or flight response. Although this is a critical Hormone and Diet, excess circulating levels can lead to increased stress, hypertension, and obesity. This can be particularly problematic in peri- and postmenopausal women, who are already more susceptible to obesity.

The dietary solution: Alcohol and caffeine can both increase cortisol secretion. Therefore, these products should be avoided if you are under chronic stress or if you are peri- or postmenopausal. In addition, studies suggested that the weight loss caused by following either Nordic nutrition recommendations or an paleo diet reduced cortisol levels [3].

foods for diet

Eat the Right Type of Food

There are many other ways that eating certain foods can be beneficial or have negative effects on the levels of specific Hormone and Diet. However, one of the main concerns with the modern-day food-chain is the high levels of hormones in many items we consume. Although meat can provide valuable nutrients, it is important to remember that not all meat is created equal! Many animals consumed in the United States are not fed a natural diet: they receive antibiotics and hormone-based diets, which could have the knock-on effect of altering hormone levels in anyone consuming the resulting meat. Therefore, it is always best to reduce meat intake and select organic, grass-fed meat and meat products whenever possible.

The changes in hormone levels that we all experience can be very stressful, and you might be confused about how you can reduce your symptoms. Making just some dietary changes, together with a regular exercise program, really can make a difference!

Testosterone Injections – Curious about testosterone injections Therapy? Read more about what you can expect from this treatment and contact us for more information (866) 224-5698

References

  1. Messina, M., Soy foods, isoflavones, and the health of postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr, 2014. 100 Suppl 1: p. 423s-30s.
  2. Lee, D.M., et al., Association of hypogonadism with vitamin D status: the European Male Ageing Study. Eur J Endocrinol, 2012. 166(1): p. 77-85.
  3. Stomby, A., et al., Diet-induced weight loss has chronic tissue-specific effects on glucocorticoid metabolism in overweight postmenopausal women. Int J Obes (Lond), 2015. 39(5): p. 814-9.