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July 31, 2018 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

The 6 Effects of Testosterone in Your Body 0 (0)

The 6 Effects of Testosterone in Your Body

6 Effects of Testosterone in Your Body, However, the body changes as we age and loses some of its regenerative capacity. A fundamental part of this decline roots from a slow-down in our hormonal secretions. Simply put, even young people with glandular issues who do not produce enough testosterone and/or HGH experience side effects and maladies that are usually only associated with much older individuals. Conversely, older patients with higher hormone levels, be it naturally or via hormone replacement therapy, have health benefits normally associated with younger individuals.

Also, Women’s Can Be at Risk for Low Testosterone:

The ovaries are responsible for producing both testosterone and estrogen, as the ovaries age, they produce less estrogen and testosterone. As women enter peri-menopause and pre-menopause, testosterone will be diminished by the age of 30’s, and once a women reach full menopause, it’s common for them to produce 75% less testosterone than they did in the there 21’s. Every woman becomes at risk of low testosterone as she ages, and women who go through hysterectomy or oophorectomy have an even higher chance of dealing or having low testosterone in women levels.

6 Effects of Testosterone in Your Body.

  • Changes the Brain:

Research has shown that women have a significant advantage when it comes to a few things, Like memory and language, while men tend to have stronger spatial skills (though this too has been disputed). But due to ethical restrictions, no study had been able to track the direct effect that testosterone exposure has on the brain—until now.

The hormone also plays a role in your state of mind, including how well your brain works. That’s why low testosterone has linked to symptoms such as mood swings, increased stress, and depression. … “Cells in the brain have testosterone receptors, and low testosterone in those receptors are significantly affected mental health.”

  • Muscle and Strength:

Recent studies have shown that men as they age, they lose more muscle mass than women of the same period, and has led researchers to believe that the loss of muscle strength and has it has a direct link to the predominantly male decline hormone, like testosterone. Testosterone helps to build muscle mass and strength in young men.

Testosterone supplementation in men increases fat-free mass, but whether measures of muscle performance, such as maximal voluntary strength, power, fatigability, or specific tension, are improved has not been determined. … A seated leg press exercise defined maximal voluntary muscle strength and fatigability.

  • Bone Density and Osteoporosis:

As men age, their serum testosterone concentrations decrease, as do their bone densities. Because bone density is also low in hypogonadal men, we hypothesized that increasing the serum testosterone concentrations of men over 65 yr to those found in young men would raise their bone densities.

Testosterone increases levels of growth hormone. That makes the exercise more likely to build muscle. Testosterone increases bone density and tells the bone marrow to manufacture red blood cells. … Dropping the levels of testosterone can cause an increase in body fat.

  • Sex Drive and Libido:

Some men maintain sexual desire at relatively to low testosterone level. For other men, libido may lag even with normal testosterone levels and low testosterone is one of the possible causes of low desire and sex drive, however. If testosterone has lowered far enough, virtually all men will experience some decline in sex drive.

Growth hormone (GH) has also been used to reverse or correct erectile dysfunction and other sexually impeding disorders and the primarily by improving circulation and blood flow, which results in a firmer, more sustainable erection.

  • Bone Marrow and Red Blood Cells:

Erythropoiesis affects the production of new red blood cells. One is accomplished primarily in the bone marrow, the red blood cell factory. Erythropoiesis is stimulated mainly by erythropoietin (hence, the clever naming of that hormone!). … Androgens, including testosterone, are another type of hormone.

Testosterone and other androgens have an erythropoietic stimulating effect that can cause polycythemia, which manifests as an increase in hemoglobin, hematocrit, or red blood cell count. … If hematocrit elevated before starting testosterone, the cause should determine before beginning androgen therapy

  • Skin and Collagen:

A man or women with shrinking levels of testosterone actually may lose some body hair. Testosterone replacement therapy comes with a few potential side effects, including acne and breast enlargement. Testosterone patches may cause minor skin irritation.

In fact, research now suggests that bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (or BHRT) can actually reverse many of the signs of aging and that you may have come to accept – weight gain, low libido, reduced muscle mass – and can even help to prevent conditions such as osteoporosis, heart disease, and dementia.

 

(more…)

July 27, 2018 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

Hormone Therapy Benefits & Risks in Women 0 (0)

Hormone Therapy Benefits & Risks in Women

Hormone Therapy Benefits is one of the government-approved treatments for relief of menopausal symptoms. These symptoms, caused by lower levels of estrogen at menopause, include hot flashes, sleep disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Hormone Therapy here is some background information.

Hormone Therapy Benefits & Risks in Women

There are Three-Benchmark Stages of Natural Menopause:

Perimenopause (or the menopause transition) is the span of time between the start of symptoms (such as irregular periods) and one year after the final menstrual period.

Menopause is confirmed one year (12 months) after the final menstrual period. Postmenopause is all the years beyond menopause.

There are Basic Types of Hormone Therapies:

Estrogen Therapy means hormone-only therapy. Estrogen is the hormone that helps most menopausal symptom relief. Estrogen Therapy is prescribed for women without a uterus due to a hysterectomy.

Estrogen-Progesterone-Testosterone:

This Therapy means combined testosterone, estrogen plus progestogen therapy. Progestogen is added to Therapy to protect women with a uterus against uterine (endometrial) cancer from estrogen alone.

There are General Ways To Take Hormone Therapies :

The Systemic products circulate throughout the bloodstream and to all parts of the body at a cellular level. They are available in oral tablet, patch, gel, spray, or injection and other forms.

Local (nonsystemic) products affect only a specific or localized area of the body. They are available as a ring, cream, and tablet can use for vaginal symptoms.

Hormonal Benefits:

Hundreds of clinical studies all around the world have been done and have provided evidence that systemic Hormone Therapy Benefits (estrogen with or without progestogen and testosterone) These hormones are useful in helping such conditions as vaginal dryness, night sweats, hot flashes, bone loss and more. These benefits can lead to improved depression, sleep, sexual relations, and also the quality of life.

One of the primary indications for Hormone Therapy is hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and prevention of osteoporosis.

The Risks:

To minimize health risks, Hormone Therapy Benefits recommended at the lowest effective dose for the shortest period. The real concern about hormone safety is with long-term use of systemic Estrogen Therapy or Estrogen Progesterone Therapy.

As a result in Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, the U.S Food & Drug Administration, and Health Canada require all estrogen-containing prescription therapies to carry a “black box” and warning in their prescribing information about the adverse risks of Hormone Therapy.

Although only two products, was studied in the Women’s Health Initiative, Premarin, and Prempro, the risks of all Hormone Therapy products, including “natural” bioidentical and compounded hormones, should be assumed to be similar until evidence shows otherwise.

Most of the risk of breast cancer associated with Estrogen Progesterone Therapy. Both Estrogen Therapy and Estrogen Progesterone Therapy have associated with stroke, heart attack and the body increase in blood clots in the veins, also these risks can be higher in women over 60’s.

The Weighing in the Benefits & Risks:

There is no single way to ensure the best possible quality of life around menopause and beyond. Each woman is unique and must consider her discomfort against her fear of treatment. The risk defined as the possibility or chance of harm; it does not indicate that damage will occur. Generally, Hormone Therapy risks are lower in younger women than initially reported in all women ages 50 to 70 combined. It now believed that women taking estrogen alone—women who have had their uterus removed by a hysterectomy—have a more favorable benefit-risk profile than those taking Estrogen Progesterone Therapy, and this is especially true for younger menopausal in women (in their 50s or within ten years of menopause) than for older women.

Medical professionals have modified their views about the role of hormones as more research conducted and what are the benefits. Experts agreed that there is much to learn, they don’t necessarily address all of the issues an individual woman faces. Only she, with the counsel of her health care providers, can do that.

Only after examining and understanding her situation and after a thorough consultation with her clinician can a woman make the best treatment choice. As new therapies and guidelines are available, and as a woman’s body changes over time, reevaluation and adjustments should make.

Hormone Therapy Information on: