Look Your Best, Feel Your Best, and Be Your Best With AAIClinics
Call Us
(866) 224-5698
Mon-Fri: 10am-6pm
Sat-Sun: Closed
November 30, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 1 Comment

The Relationship Between Hormones and Stress 0 (0)

Hormones and Stress

Hormones and Stress in the holiday season are upon us! Although this can a wonderful time filled with love and laughter, it can also significantly increase the day-to-day stresses experienced by many people; this can easily turn into chronic stress. Did you know that chronic stress can have a significant impact on your normal hormonal responses? Read on to learn more about the effects stress can have on your body and what you can do about it.

Hormones and Stress

The Hormones and Stress feeling that we all know so well is part of the body’s normal response to a real or perceived threat. However, your body does not differentiate between serious physical threats and “normal” pressures, and so a heavy workload or demands from your family can build up over time and have a detrimental effect on your health.

The stress response is commonly known as the “fight or flight” response, and it begins in the brain. When a stress is perceived, the amygdala sends a signal to the hypothalamus, which activates the sympathetic nervous system and triggers the release of adrenaline from the adrenal glands into the bloodstream. Adrenaline then accelerates the heartbeat to pump more blood to the muscles in preparation for “flight.” In addition, the pulse, blood pressure, and breathing rate all increase to enhance the amount of oxygen inhaled. Other senses, such as sight and hearing, become sharper.

The Normal Stress Response

 

During the second phase of the stress response, the hypothalamus releases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which stimulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). ACTH then stimulates the release of cortisol from the adrenal glands, which ensures that the body remains on “high alert.” Cortisol levels remain elevated until the threat passes; the stress response is then shut down once the brain perceives that the threat is no longer there (http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/understanding-the-stress-response).

Hormones and Stress

The Effects of Stress

Prolonged periods of stress prevent the shut-down of the normal stress response because the body remains on high-alert and producing cortisol. The long-term exposure to cortisol and other Hormones and Stress has a number of negative effects throughout the body, including:

  1. In the respiratory system, the accelerated breathing rate could lead to asthma or panic attacks (http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-body.aspx).
  2. In the cardiovascular system, prolonged periods of an elevated heart rate and increased blood pressure can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.
  3. In the liver, the increased levels of cortisol stimulate the production of glucose in anticipation of increased energy demands. Such prolonged exposure to elevated blood glucose levels might increase the risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.
  4. Some animal studies have suggested that chronic stress can reduce testosterone levels and sperm production and maturation in men; it can even lead to erectile dysfunction and impotence.
  5. In women, chronic stress can lead to an irregular menstrual cycle, worsened premenstrual syndrome symptoms, and reduced libido.
  6. Stress can also dampen the immune system.
  7. Emotionally, stress can affect your sleep, increase irritability, anxiety, and depression, and reduce concentration.

How to Reduce the Effects of Stress

There is no need to worry: there is a lot you can do to counteract the natural stress responses that occur at this time of year. It is important to understand what makes you stressed, as well as what makes you relax. For example, there are several lifestyle changes that can help reduce stress (http://www.webmd.com/balance/stress-management/stress-management-relieving-stress):

  1. Take time out to do something you enjoy
  2. Express your feelings
  3. Use relaxation techniques such as meditation
  4. Exercise regularly; exercise is one of the best ways of reducing stress

Because many of the symptoms of chronic stress are also associated with low hormones, such as sleep loss, fatigue, and low testosterone levels, we recommend getting your Hormones and Stress levels checked if you experience any prolonged, unusual or unexplained stress. At AAI Clinic, we can measure your Hormones, Testosterone Injections, and Stress and make recommendations regarding any hormone replacement therapy or supplements that could alleviate your stress-related symptoms.

Testosterone Injections – Curious about testosterone injections Therapy? Read more about what you can expect from this treatment and contact us for more information (866) 224-LowT (5698)

References

  1. Golbidi, S., J.C. Frisbee, and I. Laher, Chronic stress impacts the cardiovascular system: animal models and clinical outcomes. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, 2015. 308(12): p. H1476-98.
  2. Bergmann, N., F. Gyntelberg, and J. Faber, The appraisal of chronic stress and the development of the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of prospective cohort studies. Endocr Connect, 2014. 3(2): p. R55-80.
  3. Kalaitzidou, I., et al., Stress management and erectile dysfunction: a pilot comparative study. Andrologia, 2014. 46(6): p. 698-702.
  4. Gannon, L., et al., Perimenstrual symptoms: relationships with chronic stress and selected lifestyle variables. Behav Med, 1989. 15(4): p. 149-59.
  5. Golkar, A., et al., The Influence of Work-Related Chronic Stress on the Regulation of Emotion and on Functional Connectivity in the Brain. PLoS ONE, 2014. 9(9): p. e104550.

November 16, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 5 Comments

The Health Benefits Of Raw Cacao 0 (0)

The Benefits Of Raw Cacao

Today’s media is full of reports about so-called “superfoods.” While most of these reports are based on some level of fact, misrepresentation or poor interpretation of medical and scientific findings often leads to misinformation and sensational yet misleading headlines. A prime example of this is raw cacao. The health benefits of raw cacao are astounding; however, this, unfortunately, does not necessarily mean that eating a bar of milk chocolate each day will have the same effects. Read on to learn more about the ways in which raw cacao can improve your health and how to take full advantage.

What is Raw Cacao?

Cacao-based products are made from cacao beans and include cacao powder, nibs, paste, and butter. raw cacao

When purchasing raw cacao products such as powder, it is important to understand the differences between raw cacao powder and the more common cocoa powder. Raw cacao powder is very pure. It is made from raw, unroasted cocoa beans via a process known as cold pressing, which removes the fat in the form of cacao butter; much of the bean and nutrients remain intact.

Cacao is one of the best sources of flavonoids (which are potent antioxidants) available, which means that it has huge health benefits. It is also rich in protein, cholesterol-free and monounsaturated fats, fiber, natural carbohydrates, and minerals (including zinc, iron, potassium, magnesium, copper, manganese, and calcium).

Cocoa powder is produced in a similar way to cacao powder, except that it undergoes high-temperature processing during production. Although it retains significant health benefits, the high temperatures used to destroy some of the nutritional value. As cocoa undergoes further processing to make reduced-strength dark chocolate and milk chocolate, increasing amounts of the nutrients are removed. Therefore, raw cacao powder, cocoa powder, or very strong dark chocolate are recommended for optimal health benefits.

what-is-raw-cacao

Cardiovascular benefits

Many people are at an increased risk of cardiovascular events as they age. The good news is that the consumption of certain foods can help reduce this risk. Cocoa-based products can have significant beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system by reducing cardiovascular risk and atherosclerosis, improving circulation, lowering the levels of LDL (bad) and increasing the levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, and reducing blood pressure. Many of these effects are caused by the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of the flavonoids.

  • Cacao- and cocoa-based products can reduce hypertension. For example, the Cocoa, Cognition, and Aging (CoCoA) Study was performed in 90 elderly individuals who received cocoa-based drinks with high, medium, or low flavonoid content. Blood pressure was reduced significantly in patients that received high- or medium-content cocoa compared with those that received low flavonoid cocoa [1]. The subjects also exhibited improved insulin resistance and reduced lipid peroxidation.
  • Cardiovascular function. A recent study assessed vascular stiffness in healthy younger (<35) and older (50–80) men who drank cocoa or a control drink twice a day for two weeks. The subjects who drank cocoa exhibited significantly improved cardiovascular function, as measured by improved endothelial function, blood pressure, and vascular stiffness [2]. A second similar study confirmed these effects and also indicated that the consumption of high-flavonoid chocolate improved platelet aggregation (an indicator of the ability of the blood to form clots) compared with low flavonoid chocolate [3].
  • Cholesterol. Several studies have investigated the ability of cocoa and cacao to improve cholesterol. For example, consuming 400 g cocoa powder with 500 ml skimmed milk per day increased HDL and lowered LDL cholesterol levels in elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease [4]. Similar observations were made in young healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects [5] and in elderly healthy individuals [6].

cacao

Cognitive function

The available data suggest that cocoa and cacao could help protect against cognitive decline in aging individuals.

  • In the same CoCoA study described above, subjects that received cocoa with a high or medium flavonoid content had significant improvements in two different measures of cognitive function: a trail making test and a verbal fluency test. The improvements were greatest in the high flavonoid vs. the intermediate flavonoid group. However, there were no improvements in the mini-mental state evaluation among groups [1].
  • Cocoa and cacao might also protect against dementia and related diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease [7].

Metabolic Effects

The risk of metabolic diseases often increases as we age, and conditions such as diabetes and obesity are associated with reduced mortality. Luckily, cocoa could help reduce the risk of these conditions and their symptoms. Possibly the most important metabolic effect of cocoa is its ability to improve insulin sensitivity. In one study, subjects received dark or white chocolate (with high and zero flavonoid content, respectively), and insulin sensitivity was assessed using glucose tolerance tests and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. Dark, but not white, chocolate significantly improved both measures of insulin sensitivity and reduced blood pressure [8].

Hormonal Changes

The symptoms of many aging-related diseases have been linked to reduced hormone levels over time. Therefore, improving natural hormone production can reduce the symptoms of many aging-related diseases. Cocoa can have beneficial effects on the production of several hormones.

  • Testosterone Injections. Cocoa and cacao contain high concentrations of zinc, which has been shown to increase testosterone production [9].
  • Stress hormones. We all know that nice, relaxed feeling that occurs when we eat a delicious, rich piece of dark chocolate. It turns out that there is a physiological reason for this! Cocoa can potently inhibit the release of the stress hormone cortisol. Healthy men aged 20–50 who consumed a single piece of dark chocolate had a significantly reduced response to a psychosocial stressor. These effects were caused by inhibiting the release of the stress hormones cortisol and epinephrine from the adrenal gland [10].

So, there you have it! Cocoa really is a super-food. It is not only delicious but, when eaten in unprocessed forms, it has significant health benefits.

Testosterone Injections – Curious about testosterone injections Therapy? Read more about what you can expect from this treatment and contact us for more information (866) 224-5698

References

[1] D. Mastroiacovo, C. Kwik-Uribe, D. Grassi, S. Necozione, A. Raffaele, L. Pistacchio, R. Righetti, R. Locale, M.C. Lechiara, C. Marini, C. Ferri, G. Desideri, Cocoa flavanol consumption improves cognitive function, blood pressure control, and metabolic profile in elderly subjects: the Cocoa, Cognition, and Aging (CoCoA) Study–a randomized controlled trial, The American journal of clinical nutrition, 101 (2015) 538-548.

[2] C. Heiss, R. Sansone, H. Karimi, M. Krabbe, D. Schuler, A. Rodriguez-Mateos, T. Kraemer, M.M. Cortese-Krott, G.G. Kuhnle, J.P. Spencer, H. Schroeter, M.W. Marx, M. Kelm, Impact of cocoa flavanol intake on age-dependent vascular stiffness in healthy men: a randomized, controlled, double-masked trial, Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands), 37 (2015) 9794.

[3] G. Rull, Z.N. Mohd-Zain, J. Shiel, M.H. Lundberg, D.J. Collier, A. Johnston, T.D. Warner, R. Corder, Effects of high flavanol dark chocolate on cardiovascular function and platelet aggregation, Vascular Pharmacology, 71 (2015) 70-78.

[4] N. Khan, M. Monagas, C. Andres-Lacueva, R. Casas, M. Urpi-Sarda, R.M. Lamuela-Raventos, R. Estruch, Regular consumption of cocoa powder with milk increases HDL cholesterol and reduces oxidized LDL levels in subjects at high-risk of cardiovascular disease, Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD, 22 (2012) 1046-1053.

[5] S. Martinez-Lopez, B. Sarria, J.L. Sierra-Cinos, L. Goya, R. Mateos, L. Bravo, Realistic intake of a flavanol-rich soluble cocoa product increases HDL-cholesterol without inducing anthropometric changes in healthy and moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects, Food & function, 5 (2014) 364-374.

[6] N. Neufingerl, Y.E. Zebregs, E.A. Schuring, E.A. Trautwein, Effect of cocoa and theobromine consumption on serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations: a randomized controlled trial, The American journal of clinical nutrition, 97 (2013) 1201-1209.

[7] L. Dubner, J. Wang, L. Ho, L. Ward, G.M. Pasinetti, Recommendations for Development of New Standardized Forms of Cocoa Breeds and Cocoa Extract Processing for the Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease: Role of Cocoa in Promotion of Cognitive Resilience and Healthy Brain Aging, Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD, 48 (2015) 879-889.

[8] D. Grassi, C. Lippi, S. Necozione, G. Desideri, C. Ferri, Short-term administration of dark chocolate is followed by a significant increase in insulin sensitivity and a decrease in blood pressure in healthy persons, The American journal of clinical nutrition, 81 (2005) 611-614.

[9] C.D. Hunt, P.E. Johnson, J. Herbel, L.K. Mullen, Effects of dietary zinc depletion on seminal volume and zinc loss, serum testosterone concentrations, and sperm morphology in young men, The American journal of clinical nutrition, 56 (1992) 148-157.

[10] P.H. Wirtz, R. von Kanel, R.E. Meister, A. Arpagaus, S. Treichler, U. Kuebler, S. Huber, U. Ehlert, Dark chocolate intake buffers stress reactivity in humans, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 63 (2014) 2297-2299.

November 8, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 6 Comments

What are the Symptoms of Peri-menopause 0 (0)

What is the Peri-menopause?

As women, our bodies go through dramatic changes as we age, and these changes are caused by our hormones. Perimenopause is the time of a woman’s life when her hormonal cycle slows, her fertility reduces, and periods become less common as she heads toward menopause. It can be a very stressful time because it affects her physical and emotional state.

To understand what causes the peri-menopause and how to best reduce the symptoms, it is important to appreciate the changes that occur in the female body during aging. There are four main stages in a woman’s hormonal life:

Puberty

Puberty is the process of sexual maturation; it normally begins around the age of 11 and lasts for several years. Generally, it begins with breast development, followed by the growth of pubic hair and finally menstruation.

The Reproductive Years

The reproductive years begin with the onset of menstruation and persist until peri-menopause. They are characterized by the menstrual cycle, which controls a woman’s fertility. The menstrual cycle is primarily governed by fluctuations in the levels of the hormones that control ovulation and regulate the thickness of the uterine lining to prepare for the implantation of a possible fertilized egg.

  • The hypothalamus secretes gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).
  • FSH stimulates follicles in the ovaries to prepare an egg for maturation and release, which includes the secretion of estrogen to prepare the uterus for implantation.
  • LH triggers ovulation, or the release of an egg from the ovaries, which results in the production and release of progesterone and additional estrogen to prepare the body for fertilization and pregnancy [1].

Menopause

Perimenopause

Perimenopause occurs when a woman’s hormonal cycle transitions toward menopause and infertility begin. It often starts in women in their late-40’s and can last for up to 11 years; the average duration is ~4 years. During the peri-menopause, menses become less common and the symptoms typically associated with menopause (discussed below) begin.

The changes that occur during menopause are caused by altered hormone levels. A woman remains fertile only as long as her ovaries produce and secrete eggs via a process known as ovulation. Since there are a finite number of eggs, female fertility essentially has an expiration date. The production of estrogen and progesterone relies upon ovulation, which means that hormone production is diminished significantly once eggs are no longer released.

Hormonally, the peri-menopause is defined by persistently increased LH and FSH levels and very low estrogen and progesterone levels. Testosterone secretion can also decline by approximately 50% during peri-menopause [2].

Menopause

Menopause officially starts one year after a woman’s last period. Menopausal women produce very high levels of FSH but low levels of estrogen and progesterone. They are no longer fertile and are at a higher risk of diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease because of the reduced hormone concentrations [3].perimenopause

What are the Symptoms of Peri-Menopause?

The most common symptoms of peri-menopause (http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide-perimenopause#2) are:

  • Hot flashes
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Discomfort and dryness during sex
  • Fatigue
  • Problems sleeping
  • Mood swings
  • Migraines
  • Severe premenstrual syndrome
  • Irregular periods
  • Breast tenderness
  • An urgent need to urinate
  • Urine leakage, particularly when sneezing or coughing

Because some of these symptoms can be caused by other hormone-related conditions, we always recommend getting your hormone levels checked to ensure that you receive an accurate diagnosis. If you visit AAI Rejuvenation Clinic with the above symptoms, we will measure the levels of your sex hormones as part of our work up. This will allow us to develop a specific program to make you feel like your old self.

Alleviate Your Symptoms with Hormone-Replacement Therapy (HRT)

Unfortunately, the transition from fertility to menopause is part of natural aging and it happens to all women. Although the symptoms of perimenopause can be severe, it is possible to reduce their severity and be able to function fully.

For many years, HRT was used to alleviate the symptoms of peri-menopause and reduce the risk of mortality, dementia, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis in aging women. Although a now-revised link to an increased risk of breast cancer led to a temporary decline in the use of HRT, it is again the number one treatment and disease-prevention strategy used in peri-menopausal and menopausal women [4].

As the name suggests, the aim of HRT is to replace the hormones no longer being produced naturally. The hormones are often delivered in tablet form, although transdermal Testosterone Patches, creams, Testosterone Gels, and implants can also be used. There are four major forms of HRT:

  • Estrogen alone
  • Estrogen and progesterone
  • Gonadomimetics, which contain estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone; an example is a tibolone
  • SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators)

Because HRT can restore your hormone levels to those you experienced when you were young, it can relieve your symptoms and also reduce the risk of diseases associated with low hormone levels such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Although some studies have suggested that HRT could protect against stroke, diabetes, cognitive aging, and mood, these effects are more controversial [5]. Nevertheless, the clinical evidence supporting the beneficial effects of HRT in cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis is convincing:

  • HRT reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases. An evidence-based study investigated the evidence from randomized clinical trials and concluded that HRT could reduce the risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease in women within 10 years of the menopause aged <60 years [5]. However, there is evidence that HRT should be avoided in older women because it might increase the risk of coronary events [6].
  • HRT reduces the risk of osteoporosis. One of the best-known benefits of HRT is its ability to inhibit bone loss and reduce the incidence of fractures in perimenopausal women; estrogen therapy might be more effective than combined estrogen-progesterone treatment [7].

In addition to these clinical effects, HRT alleviates the symptoms of peri-menopause including skin and hair complaints and sexual symptoms [8], as well as hot flashes [9].

Measure your hormone levels today and find out if HRT could improve your day-to-day life.

References

  • [1] R.E. Jones, K.H. Lopez, Human reproductive biology, Academic Press2006.
  • [2] S.J. Richardson, The biological basis of the menopause, Bailliere’s clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 7 (1993) 1-16.
  • [3] L. Jia, H. Jin, J. Zhou, L. Chen, Y. Lu, Y. Ming, Y. Yu, A potential anti-tumor herbal medicine, Corilagin, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth through blocking the TGF-beta signaling pathways, BMC complementary, and alternative medicine, 13 (2013) 33.
  • [4] R.A. Lobo, J.H. Pickar, J.C. Stevenson, W.J. Mack, H.N. Hodis, Back to the future: Hormone replacement therapy as part of a prevention strategy for women at the onset of menopause, Atherosclerosis, 254 (2016) 282-290.
  • [5] R. Sood, S.S. Faubion, C.L. Kuhle, J.M. Thielen, L.T. Shuster, Prescribing menopausal hormone therapy: an evidence-based approach, International Journal of Women’s Health, 6 (2014) 47-57.
  • [6] R.A. Lobo, Where are we 10 years after the Women’s Health Initiative?, The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 98 (2013) 1771-1780.
  • [7] The 2012 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society, Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19 (2012) 257-271.
  • [8] D. Rouskova, K. Mittmann, U. Schumacher, H. Dietrich, T. Zimmermann, Effectiveness, tolerability and acceptance of an oral estradiol/levonorgestrel formulation for the treatment of menopausal complaints: a non-interventional observational study over six cycles of 28 days, Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 30 (2014) 712-716.
  • [9] N. Santoro, C.N. Epperson, S.B. Mathews, Menopausal Symptoms and Their Management, Endocrinology and metabolism clinics of North America, 44 (2015) 497-515.

November 2, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 2 Comments

The Importance of Exercise 0 (0)

 

Exercise is Important why? 

Exercise, As humans, we are not designed to be stationary. Our ancestors were hunter-gatherers who were forced to live active lives to find food and survive. Unfortunately, today’s lifestyle is increasingly sedentary, which can exacerbate several of the symptoms of healthy aging and aging-related diseases.

aai-logo

If you are reading this article, you might be concerned with the symptoms caused by the declining hormone levels that occur during aging. You might even be receiving or considering HGH & Testosterone Therapy with AAI Rejuvenation Clinic. However, did you know that building and maintaining a regular exercise regime can increase your energy levels, reduce pain and the symptoms of illness, and improve your mood and memory? Exercise is a critical part of healthy aging. Read on to learn more about how exercise can complement your hormone replacement therapy to help you feel young and full of life.

Physical Benefits of Exercise

Although the tangible benefits of exercise are clear, some people still avoid exercising because of their age, physical state, or lack of time. None of these are good excuses! Exercise is crucial for all of us, whether we need to lose weight, want to build muscle, or strengthen our joints. The physical benefits of exercise include:

  • Fat loss and muscle gain. One of the best-characterized effects of a well-designed exercise regimen is an altered body composition, which results in a reduced fat mass and an increased muscle mass. Although this may not manifest as “weight loss,” since muscle weighs more than fat, these changes in your physical composition are highly desirable!
  • Improved mobility, balance, flexibility, and coordination. Movement, balance, and coordination are critical for so many aspects of daily life but, unfortunately, these often decline as we age. Several low-impact exercises can improve your balance and coordination, and some exercise suggested by the Mayo Clinic can be found. Nevertheless, please bear in mind that only physician-supervised exercise programs should be followed to ensure that you receive the maximal benefit without risking your health.
  • Reduce the risk of chronic diseases. The long-term benefits of a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise seem to be never-ending. For example, active individuals have a significantly lower risk of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and even cancer [1-3]. Although the mechanisms behind these effects are involved, they include improved immune function, enhanced metabolism, lower blood pressure, improved digestion, and increased hormone secretion.

 

the importance of exercise

Emotional and Mental Benefits of Exercise

The benefits associated with a regular exercise program are not just physical! By helping to normalize your hormone levels, improving your immune and metabolic function, and enhancing your body composition, exercise also has the following mental and emotional benefits:

  • Reduced stress and improved mood. A key advantage of exercise is its ability to rapidly and efficiently reduce weight [4]. Exercise stimulates the release of endorphins, which result in a feeling of happiness and reduced anxiety and sadness [5]. Because being physically active reduces your fat mass and increases your muscle mass, active individuals often have more confidence, which further improves mood.
  • Improved sleep. Science has confirmed that regular exercise helps you fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer [6]. Indeed, people who do not do get regular exercise are more likely to feel tired during the day.

 

non-excercise

Boost Your Hormone Levels

In addition to all the fantastic benefits described above, exercise can also boost the body’s natural hormone production via a number of mechanisms. The ability of exercise to stimulate testosterone therapy, GH, and IGF-I output has been reported in several different populations. For example:

  • The Importance of Exercise free testosterone levels in women [7].
  • The Importance of Exercise such as resistance training reduces blood pressure and increases testosterone levels in overweight and obese men [8, 9].
  • Anaerobic exercise increases IGF-I levels in young men and GH levels in both men and women [10].

Testosterone Injections – Curious about testosterone injections Therapy? Read more about what you can expect from this treatment and contact us for more information (866) 224-5698

Isn’t it wonderful to know that taking a little time out of your day can not only make you feel great but also improve the results of your hormone-replacement protocol?

Hopefully, you now know about just some of the benefits associated with a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and understands how this can work hand-in-hand with your hormone-replacement protocol to lead you toward a healthier tomorrow. Talk to your physician to get started today. 

Testosterone Therapy Information

References

  1. Hoffman, A.J., The Impact of Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention: Implications for Nurses. Semin Oncol Nurs, 2016. 32(3): p. 255-72.
  2. Ross, M.D., E. Malone, and G. Florida-James, Vascular Ageing and The Importance of working out: Focus on Cellular Reparative Processes. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 2016. 2016: p. 3583956.
  3. Aune, D., et al., Physical activity and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis. Eur J Epidemiol, 2015. 30(7): p. 529-42.
  4. Sciolino, N.R. and P.V. Holmes, The Importance of working out offer anxiolytic potential: a role for stress and brain noradrenergic-galaninergic mechanisms. Neurosci Biobehav Rev, 2012. 36(9): p. 1965-84.
  5. Thoren, P., et al., Endorphins and The Importance of working out: physiological mechanisms and clinical implications. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 1990. 22(4): p. 417-28.
  6. Chennaoui, M., et al., Sleep and The Importance of working out: a reciprocal issue? Sleep Med Rev, 2015. 20: p. 59-72.
  7. Lane, A.R., C.B. O’Leary, and A.C. Hackney, Menstrual cycle phase effects free testosterone responses to prolonged aerobic. Acta Physiol Hung, 2015. 102(3): p. 336-41.
  8. Kumagai, H., et al., Lifestyle modification increases serum testosterone level and decreases central blood pressure in overweight and obese men. Endocr J, 2015. 62(5): p. 423-30.
  9. O’Leary, C.B. and A.C. Hackney, Acute and chronic effects of resistance working out on the testosterone and cortisol responses in obese males: a systematic review. Physiol Res, 2014. 63(6): p. 693-704.
  10. Eliakim, A., et al., Effect of gender on the GH-IGF-I response to anaerobic working out in young adults. J Strength Cond Res, 2014. 28(12): p. 3411-5.