Look Your Best, Feel Your Best, and Be Your Best With AAIClinics
Call Us
(866) 224-5698
Mon-Fri: 10am-6pm
Sat-Sun: Closed
November 13, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

An Inside Look at Testosterone Injections Therapy 0 (0)

Inside Look Testosterone Injections Therapy

testosterone injections therapyTESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY

Testosterone is an essential factor in males, that does more for men than just promote sex drive. Low Testosterone levels decline as a part of healthy aging and are the cause of several physiological changes. Low Testosterone level symptoms include;

1) Reduced Motivation
2) Erectile Dysfunction
3) Loss of Libido or sex drive
4) Fatigue and low energy
5) Increased Cholesterol Levels
6) Memory and Concentration
7) Decreased Muscle Mass
8) Thyroid Dysfunction and more

Since these symptoms are common in low testosterone, physicians will often include hormone levels as part of routine blood work. Normal levels of testosterone are between 300 and 1,000 ng/dL. If a blood test shows that your levels are far below the norm, your doctor may suggest testosterone injections. The treatment is called TRT.

SYMPTOMS OF LOW TESTOSTERONE

Most men naturally start losing testosterone when they hit their 30’s. (low T). Common symptoms of low Testosterone include:

1) Erectile dysfunction (ED)
2) Changes in sex drive
3) Decreased sperm count
4) Depression or anxiety
5) Weight gain
6) Hot flashes

TESTOSTERONE AND DIAGNOSIS

Many men may want to diagnose themselves with a testosterone kit. The problem with self-diagnosis is that many of the symptoms of low Testosterone are healthy parts of aging. So using it for diagnosis isn’t reliable. Our doctor may order testosterone blood test. It is the only way to find out if you have low testosterone.

To get a perfect reading our doctor will take a look at your health history, physical exam and blood test to measure your testosterone levels. You’ll also likely have a test that measures your red blood cell count.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF TESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY 

The purpose of Testosterone Injections Therapy is to help regulate hormone levels and to help address problems related to low Testosterone. For men with low Testosterone, the benefits of these injections can include:

1)  Motivation and Memory Loss
2)  Sex Drive & Desire
3)  Depression and Energy
4)  Cholesterol and Osteoporosis
5)  Erectile Dysfunction
6)  Muscle Mass and Better Sleep
7)  Wounds healing & Illness
8)  Thyroid Dysfunction and more

TESTOSTERONE CAN HELP WITH FAT AND MUSCLE CHANGES

Men have less body fat than women; This is partly related to testosterone, which regulates the fat in the body and muscle maintenance in your body. You’ll likely also notice an increase in body fat, especially around your midsection.

Your hormones also help regulate muscle growth. So, with low Testosterone, you may feel like you’re losing muscle size or strength.

Testosterone shots regulate fat distribution, but you shouldn’t expect significant weight loss changes from hormone therapy alone, without exercise. As for maintenance of muscle, testosterone therapy has been found to improve increase muscle mass, but not strength.

TESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY AND SPERM COUNT

Low sperm count in men is a common side effect of low Testosterone. This problem can make it difficult to get your partner pregnant.

TESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY AND THE BOTTOM LINE

Testosterone injections therapy can only be helpful If you just have low Testosterone. If you’re wondering if testosterone is a right choice for you, ask your doctor. They can test you for low Testosterone. Ask your doctors, or Give us a call, if testosterone injections therapy would be a good choice for you.

If you don’t end up having low Testosterone but still feel like your hormone levels might be off, keep in mind that proper Food, Regular exercise, could help you increase testosterone naturally and make you feel better. If that doesn’t help, be sure you contact us for help.

July 17, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 1 Comment

All You Need to Know About Testosterone Benefits 0 (0)

What You Need to Know About Testosterone Benefits

Right around the age of 30, most men experience a significant “shift” in their lives. They can’t tell what it is. They can’t quite put their finger on it. All they know is, something has “changed”. Usually, men attribute it to being “tired” from working so hard, keeping up with the kids and maintaining their household. The supposition is, “if I can only get one good nights rest, I’ll be all better the next day,” but that day never comes. (*) Individual Results May Vary & Are Not Guaranteed

(more…)

February 4, 2016 by admin 0 Comments

Depo Testosterone Description and Information 0 (0)

Depo Testosterone

Depo Testosterone Injection, for intramuscular injection, contains testosterone cypionate which is the oil-soluble 17 (beta)- cyclopentyl propionate ester of the androgenic hormone testosterone.

Testosterone cypionate is a white or creamy white crystalline powder, odorless or nearly so and stable in air. It is insoluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol, chloroform, dioxane, ether, and soluble in vegetable oils.

The chemical name for testosterone cypionate is androst-4-en-3-one, 17-(3-cyclopentyl-1-oxopropoxy)-, (17β)-. Its molecular formula is C27H40O3, and the molecular weight 412.61.

The structural formula is represented below:


Depo-Testosterone Injection is available in two strengths, 100 mg/mL, and 200 mg/mL testosterone cypionate.

Each mL of the 100 mg/mL solution contains:
Testosterone cypionate……………………………………………………………………….. 100 mg
Benzyl benzoate …………………………………………………………………………………. 0.1 mL
Cottonseed oil …………………………………………………………………………………… 736 mg
Benzyl alcohol (as preservative) …………………………………………………………… 9.45 mg

Each mL of the 200 mg/mL solution contains:
Testosterone cypionate ………………………………………………………………………. 200 mg
Benzyl benzoate …………………………………………………………………………………. 0.2 mL
Cottonseed oil …………………………………………………………………………………… 560 mg
Benzyl alcohol (as preservative) …………………………………………………………… 9.45 mg

Depo Testosterone – Clinical Pharmacology
Endogenous androgens are responsible for normal growth and development of the male sex organs and for maintenance of secondary sex characteristics. These effects include growth and maturation of the prostate, seminal vesicles, penis, and scrotum; development of male hair distribution, such as beard, pubic, chest, and axillary hair; laryngeal enlargement, vocal cord thickening, and alterations in body musculature and fat distribution. Drugs in this class also cause retention of nitrogen, sodium, potassium, and phosphorous, and decreased urinary excretion of calcium. Androgens have been reported to increase protein anabolism and decrease protein catabolism. Nitrogen balance is improved only when there is sufficient intake of calories and protein.

Androgens are responsible for the growth spurt of adolescence and for eventual termination of linear growth, brought about by fusion of the epiphyseal growth centers. In children, exogenous androgens accelerate linear growth rates but may cause a disproportionate advancement in bone maturation. Use over long periods may result in fusion of the epiphyseal growth centers and termination of the growth process. Androgens have been reported to stimulate the production of red blood cells by enhancing production of erythropoietic stimulation factor.

Slideshow: Welcome to Parenthood! 10 Things To Prepare Yourself For Welcome to Parenthood! 10 Things To Prepare Yourself For:
During exogenous administration of androgens, endogenous testosterone release is inhibited through feedback inhibition of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). At large doses of exogenous androgens, spermatogenesis may also be suppressed through feedback inhibition of pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH).

There is a lack of substantial evidence that androgens are effective in fractures, surgery, convalescence, and functional uterine bleeding.

Pharmacokinetics
Testosterone esters are less polar than free testosterone. Testosterone esters in oil injected intramuscularly are absorbed slowly from the lipid phase; thus, testosterone cypionate can be given at intervals of two to four weeks.

Testosterone in plasma is 98 percent bound to a specific testosterone-estradiol binding globulin, and about 2 percent is free. Generally, the amount of this sex-hormone binding globulin in the plasma will determine the distribution of testosterone between free and bound forms, and the free testosterone concentration will determine its half-life.

About 90 percent of a dose of testosterone is excreted in the urine as glucuronic and sulfuric acid conjugates of testosterone and its metabolites; about 6 percent of a dose is excreted in the feces, mostly in the unconjugated form. Inactivation of testosterone occurs primarily in the liver. Testosterone is metabolized to various 17-keto steroids through two different pathways.

The half-life of testosterone cypionate, when injected intramuscularly, is approximately eight days.

In many tissues, the activity of testosterone therapy appears to depend on reduction to dihydrotestosterone, which binds to cytosol receptor proteins. The steroid-receptor complex is transported to the nucleus where it initiates transcription events and cellular changes related to androgen action.

Indications and Usage for Depo Testosterone

Depo Testosterone Injection is indicated for replacement therapy in the male in conditions associated with symptoms of deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone.

1. Primary hypogonadism (congenital or acquired)-testicular failure due to cryptorchidism, bilateral torsion, orchitis, vanishing testis syndrome; or orchidectomy.

2. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (congenital or acquired)- gonadotropin or LHRH deficiency, or pituitary-hypothalamic injury from tumors, trauma, or radiation.

Safety and efficacy of Depo Testosterone (testosterone cypionate) in men with “age-related hypogonadism” (also referred to as “late-onset hypogonadism”) have not been established.

Contraindications

  1. Known hypersensitivity to the drug
  2. Males with carcinoma of the breast
  3. Males with known or suspected carcinoma of the prostate gland
  4. Women who are or who may become pregnant
  5. Patients with serious cardiac, hepatic or renal disease

Warnings

Hypercalcemia may occur in immobilized patients. If this occurs, the drug should be discontinued.

Prolonged use of high doses of androgens (principally the 17-α alkyl-androgens) has been associated with the development of hepatic adenomas, hepatocellular carcinoma, and peliosis hepatis —all potentially life-threatening complications.

Geriatric patients treated with androgens may be at an increased risk of developing prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic carcinoma although conclusive evidence to support this concept is lacking.

There have been postmarketing reports of venous thromboembolic events, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients using testosterone products, such as testosterone cypionate. Evaluate patients who report symptoms of pain, edema, warmth, and erythema in the lower extremity for DVT and those who present with acute shortness of breath for PE. If a venous thromboembolic event is suspected, discontinue treatment with testosterone cypionate and initiate appropriate workup and management.

Long-term clinical safety trials have not been conducted to assess the cardiovascular outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in men. To date, epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled trials have been inconclusive for determining the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), such as non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and cardiovascular death, with the use of testosterone compared to non-use. Some studies, but not all, have reported an increased risk of MACE in association with the use of testosterone replacement therapy in men. Patients should be informed of this possible risk when deciding whether to use or to continue to use Depo Testosterone (testosterone cypionate).

Edema, with or without congestive heart failure, may be a serious complication in patients with pre-existing cardiac, renal or hepatic disease.

Gynecomastia may develop and occasionally persists in patients being treated for hypogonadism.

The preservative benzyl alcohol has been associated with serious adverse events, including the “gasping syndrome”, and death in pediatric patients. Although normal therapeutic doses of this product ordinarily deliver amounts of benzyl alcohol that are substantially lower than those reported in association with the “gasping syndrome”, the minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which toxicity may occur is not known. The risk of benzyl alcohol toxicity depends on the quantity administered and the hepatic capacity to detoxify the chemical. Premature and low-birth weight infants may be more likely to develop toxicity.

Androgen therapy should be used cautiously in healthy males with delayed puberty. The effect on bone maturation should be monitored by assessing the bone age of the wrist and hand every 6 months. In children, androgen treatment may accelerate bone maturation without producing the compensatory gain in linear growth. This adverse effect may result in compromised adult stature. The younger the child the greater the risk of compromising final mature height.

This drug has not been shown to be safe and effective for the enhancement of athletic performance. Because of the potential risk of serious adverse health effects, this drug should not be used for such purpose.

Precautions

General

Patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy may develop acute urethral obstruction. Priapism or excessive sexual stimulation may develop. Oligospermia may occur after prolonged administration or excessive dosage. If any of these effects appear, the androgen should be stopped and if restarted, a lower dosage should be utilized.

Testosterone cypionate should not be used interchangeably with testosterone propionate because of differences in duration of action.

Testosterone cypionate is not for intravenous use.

Information for patients

Patients should be instructed to report any of the following: nausea, vomiting, changes in skin color, ankle swelling, too frequent or persistent erections of the penis.

Laboratory tests

Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (to detect polycythemia) should be checked periodically in patients receiving long-term androgen administration.

Serum cholesterol may increase during androgen therapy.

Drug interactions

Androgens may increase sensitivity to oral anticoagulants. The dosage of the anticoagulant may require the reduction in order to maintain satisfactory therapeutic hypoprothrombinemia.

Concurrent administration of oxyphenbutazone and androgens may result in elevated serum levels of oxyphenbutazone.

In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, insulin requirements.

Drug/Laboratory test Interferences

Androgens may decrease levels of thyroxine-binding globulin, resulting in decreased total T4 serum levels and increased resin uptake of T3 and T4. Free thyroid hormone levels remain unchanged, however, and there is no clinical evidence of thyroid dysfunction.

Carcinogenesis

Animal data

Testosterone has been tested by subcutaneous injection and implantation in mice and rats. The implant induced cervical-uterine tumors in mice, which metastasized in some cases. There is suggestive evidence that injection of testosterone into some strains of female mice increases their susceptibility to hepatoma. Testosterone is also known to increase the number of tumors and decrease the degree of differentiation of chemically induced carcinomas of the liver in rats.

Human data

There are rare reports of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients receiving long-term therapy with androgens in high doses. Withdrawal of the drugs did not lead to regression of the tumors in all cases.

Geriatric patients treated with androgens may be at an increased risk of developing prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic carcinoma although conclusive evidence to support this concept is lacking.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category X. (See CONTRAINDICATIONS.)

Benzyl alcohol can cross the placenta. See WARNINGS.

Nursing Mothers

Depo Testosterone is not recommended for use in nursing mothers.

Pediatric use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 12 years have not been established.

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse reactions in the male have occurred with some androgens:

Endocrine and urogenital: Gynecomastia and excessive frequency and duration of penile erections. Oligospermia may occur at high dosages.

Skin and appendages: Hirsutism, male pattern of baldness, seborrhea, and acne.

Cardiovascular Disorders: myocardial infarction, stroke.

Fluid and electrolyte disturbances: Retention of sodium, chloride, water, potassium, calcium, and inorganic phosphates.

Gastrointestinal: Nausea, cholestatic jaundice, alterations in liver function tests, rarely hepatocellular neoplasms and peliosis hepatis (see WARNINGS).

Hematologic: Suppression of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X, bleeding in patients on concomitant anticoagulant therapy, and polycythemia.

Nervous system: Increased or decreased libido, headache, anxiety, depression, and generalized paresthesia.

Allergic: Hypersensitivity, including skin manifestations and anaphylactoid reactions.

Vascular disorders: Venous thromboembolism.

Miscellaneous: Inflammation and pain at the site of intramuscular injection.

Drug Abuse and Dependence

Controlled Substance Class

Testosterone is a controlled substance under the Anabolic Steroids Control Act, and Depo Testosterone Injection has been assigned to Schedule III.

Overdosage

There have been no reports of acute overdosage with the androgens.

Depo Testosterone Dosage and Administration

Prior to initiating Depo Testosterone (testosterone cypionate), confirm the diagnosis of hypogonadism by ensuring that serum testosterone concentrations have been measured in the morning on at least two separate days and that these serum testosterone concentrations are below the normal range.

Depo Testosterone Injection is for intramuscular use only.

It should not be given intravenously. Intramuscular injections should be given deep in the gluteal muscle.

The suggested dosage for Depo Testosterone Injection varies depending on the age, sex, and diagnosis of the individual patient. Dosage is adjusted according to the patient’s response and the appearance of adverse reactions.

Various dosage regimens have been used to induce pubertal changes in hypogonadal males; some experts have advocated lower dosages initially, gradually increasing the dose as puberty progresses, with or without a decrease to maintenance levels. Other experts emphasize that higher dosages are needed to induce pubertal changes and lower dosages can be used for maintenance after puberty. The chronological and skeletal ages must be taken into consideration, both in determining the initial dose and in adjusting the dose.

For replacement in the hypogonadal male, 50400 mg should be administered every two to four weeks.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit. Warming and shaking the vial should redissolve any crystals that may have formed during storage at temperatures lower than recommended.

How is Depo Testosterone Supplied

Depo Testosterone Injections is available as follows:

100 mg/mL
10 mL vials                    NDC 0009-0347-02

200 mg/mL
1 mL vials                      NDC 0009-0417-01
10 mL vials                    NDC 0009-0417-02

Vials should be stored at controlled room temperature 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP]. Protect from light.

February 4, 2016 by admin 0 Comments

Testosterone Cypionate Description 0 (0)

Testosterone Cypionate description injections

Testosterone Cypionate Description injection for intramuscular injection contains Testosterone Cypionate which is the oil-soluble 17 (beta)- cyclopentyl propionate ester of the androgenic hormone testosterone. Testosterone Cypionate is a white or creamy white crystalline powder, odorless or nearly so and stable in air. It is insoluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol, chloroform, dioxane, ether, and soluble in vegetable oils. The chemical name for Testosterone Cypionate is androst-4-en-3-one,17-(3-cyclopentyl-1-oxopropoxy)-, (17β)-. Its molecular formula is C27H40O3, and the molecular weight 412.61.

The structural formula is represented below:

Testosterone Cypionate injection, USP is available in two strengths, 100 mg/mL and 200 mg/mL Testosterone Cypionate, USP.

Each mL of the 100 mg/mL solution contains:

Testosterone Cypionate……………………………………………………………………. 100 mg
Benzyl benzoate ……………………………………………………………………………… 0.1 mL
Cottonseed oil ………………………………………………………………………………… 736 mg
Benzyl alcohol (as preservative)………………………………………………………… 9.45 mg

Each mL of the 200 mg/mL solution contains:

Testosterone Cypionate……………………………………………………………………. 200 mg
Benzyl benzoate………………………………………………………………………………. 0.2 mL
Cottonseed oil………………………………………………………………………………… 560 mg

Benzyl alcohol (as preservative)………………………………………………………… 9.45 mg

Testosterone Cypionate – Clinical Pharmacology

Endogenous androgens are responsible for normal growth and development of the male sex organs and for maintenance of secondary sex characteristics. These effects include growth and maturation of the prostate, seminal vesicles, penis, and scrotum; development of male hair distribution, such as beard, pubic, chest, and axillary hair; laryngeal enlargement, vocal cord thickening, and alterations in body musculature and fat distribution. Drugs in this class also cause retention of nitrogen, sodium, potassium, and phosphorous, and decreased urinary excretion of calcium. Androgens have been reported to increase protein anabolism and decrease protein catabolism. Nitrogen balance is improved only when there is sufficient intake of calories and protein.

Androgens are responsible for the growth spurt of adolescence and for eventual termination of linear growth, brought about by fusion of the epiphyseal growth centers. In children, exogenous androgens accelerate linear growth rates but may cause a disproportionate advancement in bone maturation. Use over long periods may result in fusion of the epiphyseal growth centers and termination of the growth process. Androgens have been reported to stimulate the production of red blood cells by enhancing production of erythropoietic stimulation factor.

During exogenous administration of androgens, endogenous testosterone release is inhibited through feedback inhibition of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). At large doses of exogenous androgens, spermatogenesis may also be suppressed through feedback inhibition of pituitary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH).

There is a lack of substantial evidence that androgens are effective in fractures, surgery, convalescence, and functional uterine bleeding.

Pharmacokinetics

Testosterone esters are less polar than free testosterone. Testosterone esters in oil injected intramuscularly are absorbed slowly from the lipid phase; thus, Testosterone Cypionate can be given at intervals of two to four weeks.

Testosterone in plasma is 98 percent bound to a specific testosterone-estradiol binding globulin, and about 2 percent is free. Generally, the amount of this sex-hormone binding globulin in the plasma will determine the distribution of testosterone between free and bound forms, and the free testosterone concentration will determine its half-life.

About 90 percent of a dose of testosterone injections is excreted in the urine as glucuronic and sulfuric acid conjugates of testosterone and its metabolites; about 6 percent of a dose is excreted in the feces, mostly in the unconjugated form. Inactivation of testosterone occurs primarily in the liver. Testosterone therapy is metabolized to various 17-keto steroids through two different pathways.

The half-life of Testosterone Cypionate, when injected intramuscularly, is approximately eight days.

In many tissues, the activity of testosterone therapy appears to depend on reduction to dihydrotestosterone, which binds to cytosol receptor proteins. The steroid-receptor complex is transported to the nucleus where it initiates transcription events and cellular changes related to androgen action.

Indications and Usage for Testosterone Cypionate description

Testosterone Cypionate description injection is indicated for replacement therapy in the male in conditions associated with symptoms of deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone.

  • Primary hypogonadism (congenital or acquired)-testicular failure due to cryptorchidism, bilateral torsion, orchitis, vanishing testis syndrome; or orchidectomy.
  • Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (congenital or acquired): gonadotropin or LHRH deficiency, or pituitary-hypothalamic injury from tumors, trauma, or radiation.

Safety and efficacy of Testosterone Cypionate description in men with “age-related hypogonadism” (also referred to as “late-onset hypogonadism”) have not been established.

Contraindications

  1. Known hypersensitivity to the drug
  2. Males with carcinoma of the breast
  3. Males with known or suspected carcinoma of the prostate gland
  4. Women who are or who may become pregnant
  5. Patients with serious cardiac, hepatic or renal disease

Warnings

Hypercalcemia may occur in immobilized patients. If this occurs, the drug should be discontinued.

Prolonged use of high doses of androgens (principally the 17-α alkyl-androgens) has been associated with the development of hepatic adenomas, hepatocellular carcinoma, and peliosis hepatis —all potentially life-threatening complications.

Geriatric patients treated with androgens may be at an increased risk of developing prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic carcinoma although conclusive evidence to support this concept is lacking.

There have been postmarketing reports of venous thromboembolic events, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients using testosterone products, such as Testosterone Cypionate description. Evaluate patients who report symptoms of pain, edema, warmth, and erythema in the lower extremity for DVT and those who present with acute shortness of breath for PE. If a venous thromboembolic event is suspected, discontinue treatment with Testosterone Cypionate description and initiate appropriate workup and management.

Long term clinical safety trials have not been conducted to assess the cardiovascular outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in men. To date, epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled trials have been inconclusive for determining the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), such as non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and cardiovascular death, with the use of testosterone compared to non-use. Some studies, but not all, have reported an increased risk of MACE in association with the use of testosterone replacement therapy in men. Patients should be informed of this possible risk when deciding whether to use or to continue to use Testosterone Cypionate description.

Edema, with or without congestive heart failure, may be a serious complication in patients with preexisting cardiac, renal or hepatic disease.

Gynecomastia may develop and occasionally persists in patients being treated for hypogonadism.

The preservative benzyl alcohol has been associated with serious adverse events, including the “gasping syndrome”, and death in pediatric patients. Although normal therapeutic doses of this product ordinarily deliver amounts of benzyl alcohol that are substantially lower than those reported in association with the “gasping syndrome”, the minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which toxicity may occur is not known. The risk of benzyl alcohol toxicity depends on the quantity administered and the hepatic capacity to detoxify the chemical. Premature and low-birth weight infants may be more likely to develop toxicity.

Androgen therapy should be used cautiously in healthy males with delayed puberty. The effect on bone maturation should be monitored by assessing the bone age of the wrist and hand every 6 months. In children, androgen treatment may accelerate bone maturation without producing a compensatory gain in linear growth. This adverse effect may result in compromised adult stature. The younger the child the greater the risk of compromising final mature height.

This drug has not been shown to be safe and effective for the enhancement of athletic performance. Because of the potential risk of serious adverse health effects, this drug should not be used for such purpose.

Precautions

General

Patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy may develop acute urethral obstruction. Priapism or excessive sexual stimulation may develop. Oligospermia may occur after prolonged administration or excessive dosage. If any of these effects appear, the androgen should be stopped and if restarted, a lower dosage should be utilized.

Testosterone Cypionate description should not be used interchangeably with testosterone propionate description because of differences in duration of action.

Testosterone Cypionate description is not for intravenous use.

Information for Patients

Patients should be instructed to report any of the following: nausea, vomiting, changes in skin color, ankle swelling, too frequent or persistent erections of the penis.

Laboratory Tests

Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (to detect polycythemia) should be checked periodically in patients receiving long-term androgen administration.

Serum cholesterol may increase during androgen therapy.

Drug Interactions

Androgens may increase sensitivity to oral anticoagulants. The dosage of the anticoagulant may require a reduction in order to maintain satisfactory therapeutic hypoprothrombinemia.

Concurrent administration of oxyphenbutazone and androgens may result in elevated serum levels of oxyphenbutazone.

In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, insulin requirements.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interferences

Androgens may decrease levels of thyroxine-binding globulin, resulting in decreased total T4 serum levels and increased resin uptake of T3 and T4. Free thyroid hormone levels remain unchanged, however, and there is no clinical evidence of thyroid dysfunction.

Carcinogenesis

Animal data

Testosterone has been tested by subcutaneous injection and implantation in mice and rats. The implant induced cervical-uterine tumors in mice, which metastasized in some cases. There is suggestive evidence that injection of testosterone into some strains of female mice increases their susceptibility to hepatoma. Testosterone is also known to increase the number of tumors and decrease the degree of differentiation of chemically induced carcinomas of the liver in rats.

Human data

There are rare reports of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients receiving long-term therapy with androgens in high doses. Withdrawal of the drugs did not lead to regression of the tumors in all cases.

Geriatric patients treated with androgens may be at an increased risk of developing prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic carcinoma although conclusive evidence to support this concept is lacking.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category X. (See CONTRAINDICATIONS)

Benzyl alcohol can cross the placenta. See WARNINGS.

Nursing Mothers

Testosterone Cypionate description is not recommended for use in nursing mothers.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 12 years have not been established.

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse reactions in the male have occurred with some androgens:

Endocrine and urogenital: Gynecomastia and excessive frequency and duration of penile erections. Oligospermia may occur at high dosages.

Skin and Appendages: Hirsutism, male pattern of baldness, seborrhea, and acne.

Cardiovascular Disorders – myocardial infarction, stroke

Fluid and electrolyte disturbances: Retention of sodium, chloride, water, potassium, calcium, and inorganic phosphates.

Gastrointestinal: Nausea, cholestatic jaundice, alterations in liver function tests, rarely hepatocellular neoplasms and peliosis hepatis (see WARNINGS).

Hematologic: Suppression of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X, bleeding in patients on concomitant anticoagulant therapy, and polycythemia.

Nervous system: Increased or decreased libido, headache, anxiety, depression, and generalized paresthesia.

Allergic: Hypersensitivity, including skin manifestations and anaphylactoid reactions.

Vascular Disorders: venous thromboembolism

Miscellaneous: Inflammation and pain at the site of intramuscular testosterone injection.

Testosterone Therapy Information

October 27, 2015 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

TESTOSTERONE CYPIONATE INFORMATION 0 (0)

TESTOSTERONE CYPIONATE INFORMATION

TESTOSTERONE CYPIONATE INFORMATION here is an interesting fact is that testosterone was actually the first ever synthesized anabolic steroid. Specifically related to testosterone Cypionate, it is a slow-acting, long-ester, oil-based injectable testosterone compound that is commonly prescribed for the treatment of men suffering from hypogonadism or an array of other possible testosterone imbalance issues.

Testosterone Cypionate first appeared on the U.S. prescription drug market during the early 1950’s, as Depo-Testosterone by Upjohn, now Pharmacia & Upjohn. Now, because testosterone Cypionate is so molecularly similar to another ester of testosterone called Enanthate, which only has a slightly shorter ester, it wasn’t very well globally recognized and, furthermore, has been acknowledged as an American medication.

Anabolic steroids, derivatives of testosterone, have been used illicitly and are now controlled substances. Men participating in these type of programs appreciate the rapid results and the extraordinary muscle growth experienced from administering these substances; even at the end cost of eventually irreversible endocrine system malfunction.

Testosterone, like many anabolic steroids, was classified as a controlled substance in 1991.

Cypionate

Before providing any more testosterone cypionate information, let’s begin by explaining esters: An ester is described as any of a class of organic compounds that react with water to produce alcohols and organic or inorganic acids.  For the most part, esters are derived from carboxylic acids. The addition of a carbon chain (ester) attached to the testosterone molecule controls how soluble (how quickly it will dissolve and exit your body) it will be once inside the bloodstream. The smaller the carbon chain, the shorter the ester, and the more soluble the medication.

A smaller or shorter ester will have a shorter half-life, which is basically a depiction of the cycle of a medication’s functionality time while inside the body. Conversely, the opposite can be said of long carbon chains, such as Cypionate, which both acts slowly within the body and exits the body equally as slow. Studies and further testosterone cypionate information research show that participants of injectable Testosterone therapy may sometimes administer more than one ester of testosterone at a time. This option allows patients to manipulate their testosterone levels more efficiently, helping to avoid peak and valley levels and their associated side effects.

Testosterone Cypionate has a 7-day half-life:

  • This means it is in your body for 14 days
  • The first 7 days it’s working on increasing your levels
  • The last 7 days it’s working on exiting your body

The good and the bad

The Good:

The Testosterone Cypionate information that patients appreciate most is that, due to the longer carbon chain (ester), it only has to be administered every 7 days in order to catch it before it begins the process of exiting the body. Though AAI Rejuvenation Clinic does not use the standard, intramuscular needle tips that most other clinics use, as ours are significantly more comfortable to utilize, most patients would still rather administer their testosterone injections as least amount of times as possible.

The Bad:

The longer a medication stays functioning in the body, the higher the potentiality for side effects to emerge. Some side effects may be:

  • Acne
  • Bloating or water retention
  • Irritability
  • Weight gain

The good within the bad:

AAI Rejuvenation Clinic’s physicians will not organize a program that includes only Testosterone, regardless of the ester. Participating patients are prescribed and an array of accompanying nutraceuticals to help ensure side effects are kept at bay. These medications are individually prescribed based on the patient’s file details. Moreover, our patients will also receive intermittent blood tests to ensure that everything is running according to plan on your quest to reach your health and wellness goals.

Fill out our Medical History Form to be contacted within 24 Business Hours by one of our expert Wellness Advisors or call us at

Call: (866) 224-5698

**NOTE**  The content contained in this blog is subject to interpretation and is the opinion of the content writer.  We do not claim it to be fact.  We encourage you to consult a medical doctor before taking any prescribed medications or supplements.

July 28, 2015 by admin 0 Comments

Testosterone Levels Impact Sexual Function In Body 5 (1)

The influence of testosterone towards sexual function and libido isn’t emphasized enough. Even though it is implicated in study after study, the need for all persons to have their testosterone therapy levels properly balanced is essential. It’s an intricate part of a properly functioning endocrine system, which is critical for feeling healthy. Testosterone injections are among the most potent of libido-enhancing agents known to mankind. Testosterone therapy is effective in raising a person’s testosterone levels. This can certainly have a positive, “rising” effect on the desire for sexual contact.

(more…)

July 27, 2015 by Joseph Fermin 2 Comments

Can a Change in Hormones Cause Chronic Fatigue? 5 (1)

Could The Hormone explain
Your Chronic Fatigue?

Men experience a slow, yet steady decline in testosterone as they age. The continued loss of this male sex hormone is sometimes referred to as male menopause or andropause. Similar to female menopause, hormonal changes come with a number of undeniable symptoms, including Chronic Fatigue. These changes are not easy to accept or notice, however, they can have a gradual, crippling feeling.

Testosterone injections play a vital role in the body’s immune response. As testosterone levels decline, the body compensates by redistributing energy and resources to the immune system. This takes a considerable toll on energy levels resulting in testosterone-related Chronic Fatigue.

Additionally, another potential relationship between free testosterone and Chronic Fatigue is sleep disruption. It isn’t uncommon for a drop in testosterone levels to cause sleep disruptions in men and women. Testosterone is naturally released into the body in different periods throughout the day. However, it is mainly produced at night when you sleep. Usually, most production occurs approximately 3 hours into your sleep cycle. You probably get little to no quality sleep if you are suffering from low testosterone. Sleep deprivation causes your natural along with all the vigorous attributions associated with it.

The loss of energy, lack of sleep, Chronic Fatigue and other symptoms linked with diminishing testosterone levels is not something you have to incorporate into your lifestyle. Fortunately, this can be improved. Here at AAI, we delve deeper into each of our patient’s history, goals, and lifestyle. We recognize that everyone is a unique individual and our bodies work differently. AAI takes this into account when we develop and organize your profile and pharmaceutical protocol. There is no one size fits all remedy. A thorough evaluation of your blood work will reveal areas of focus, signs of potential health concerns, as well as ailments you may be experiencing. Testosterone replacement therapy in conjunction with supplemental pharmaceuticals can drastically increase energy levels and reduce Chronic Fatigue. Testosterone Therapy has also been proven to improve mood, bone density, strengthen the immune system, reduce body fat, improve muscle mass, and reduce feelings of depression.

Like any use of medication, testosterone replacement therapy does not come without risks. Before injectable Testosterone replacement therapy is started, you must complete our Medical History Form, Blood Work, and Physical Examination in order to rule out any possible contradictions to Testosterone therapy. Blood Work is essential in determining your free testosterone levels. This process can be facilitated close to your home. At AAI, we feel it is imperative to continue to monitor hormone levels throughout the duration of your treatment. We have implemented various programs to help facilitate those follow up’s. You do not have to schedule an appointment to go to a lab to have blood drawn for these follow-ups. We provide you with a 7-day mouth swab kit. This provides our physician with data over a consecutive 7- day period of time for remarkable accuracy. It assures you are getting the most out of your therapy and that any required adjustments are made accordingly. This is essential to ensure that you are enjoying all the benefits that you wanted and deserve your testosterone therapy while avoiding any potential health risks.

**NOTE**  The content contained in this blog is subject to interpretation and is the opinion of the content writer.  We do not claim it to be fact.  We encourage you to consult a medical doctor before taking any prescribed medications or supplements.

At AAI Rejuvenation Clinic, we advise anyone to think seriously about beginning Hormone treatment if there is no medical need for it. However, we will take every precaution to ensure that you read all the positive benefits from your program by providing the latest at-home hormonal mouth-swab testing. This will ensure we are continually monitoring your progress and aware of any negative side effects. Fill out the Medical History Form or call us at (866) 224-5698