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November 13, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

An Inside Look at Testosterone Injections Therapy 0 (0)

Inside Look Testosterone Injections Therapy

testosterone injections therapyTESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY

Testosterone is an essential factor in males, that does more for men than just promote sex drive. Low Testosterone levels decline as a part of healthy aging and are the cause of several physiological changes. Low Testosterone level symptoms include;

1) Reduced Motivation
2) Erectile Dysfunction
3) Loss of Libido or sex drive
4) Fatigue and low energy
5) Increased Cholesterol Levels
6) Memory and Concentration
7) Decreased Muscle Mass
8) Thyroid Dysfunction and more

Since these symptoms are common in low testosterone, physicians will often include hormone levels as part of routine blood work. Normal levels of testosterone are between 300 and 1,000 ng/dL. If a blood test shows that your levels are far below the norm, your doctor may suggest testosterone injections. The treatment is called TRT.

SYMPTOMS OF LOW TESTOSTERONE

Most men naturally start losing testosterone when they hit their 30’s. (low T). Common symptoms of low Testosterone include:

1) Erectile dysfunction (ED)
2) Changes in sex drive
3) Decreased sperm count
4) Depression or anxiety
5) Weight gain
6) Hot flashes

TESTOSTERONE AND DIAGNOSIS

Many men may want to diagnose themselves with a testosterone kit. The problem with self-diagnosis is that many of the symptoms of low Testosterone are healthy parts of aging. So using it for diagnosis isn’t reliable. Our doctor may order testosterone blood test. It is the only way to find out if you have low testosterone.

To get a perfect reading our doctor will take a look at your health history, physical exam and blood test to measure your testosterone levels. You’ll also likely have a test that measures your red blood cell count.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF TESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY 

The purpose of Testosterone Injections Therapy is to help regulate hormone levels and to help address problems related to low Testosterone. For men with low Testosterone, the benefits of these injections can include:

1)  Motivation and Memory Loss
2)  Sex Drive & Desire
3)  Depression and Energy
4)  Cholesterol and Osteoporosis
5)  Erectile Dysfunction
6)  Muscle Mass and Better Sleep
7)  Wounds healing & Illness
8)  Thyroid Dysfunction and more

TESTOSTERONE CAN HELP WITH FAT AND MUSCLE CHANGES

Men have less body fat than women; This is partly related to testosterone, which regulates the fat in the body and muscle maintenance in your body. You’ll likely also notice an increase in body fat, especially around your midsection.

Your hormones also help regulate muscle growth. So, with low Testosterone, you may feel like you’re losing muscle size or strength.

Testosterone shots regulate fat distribution, but you shouldn’t expect significant weight loss changes from hormone therapy alone, without exercise. As for maintenance of muscle, testosterone therapy has been found to improve increase muscle mass, but not strength.

TESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY AND SPERM COUNT

Low sperm count in men is a common side effect of low Testosterone. This problem can make it difficult to get your partner pregnant.

TESTOSTERONE INJECTIONS THERAPY AND THE BOTTOM LINE

Testosterone injections therapy can only be helpful If you just have low Testosterone. If you’re wondering if testosterone is a right choice for you, ask your doctor. They can test you for low Testosterone. Ask your doctors, or Give us a call, if testosterone injections therapy would be a good choice for you.

If you don’t end up having low Testosterone but still feel like your hormone levels might be off, keep in mind that proper Food, Regular exercise, could help you increase testosterone naturally and make you feel better. If that doesn’t help, be sure you contact us for help.

October 25, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 3 Comments

Turmeric Health Benefits 0 (0)

Turmeric and The Health Benefits

Turmeric, Several plants, and their extracts have been reported to have health benefits, and it can be difficult to know what is true. Are all these things as good as they seem? For turmeric, the answer is a resounding yes!

Turmeric is an herbal plant grown in Asia. The roots are used to make the yellow spice turmeric, which is most commonly used in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and Iranian cooking. It is the main spice in curries and is also used to color cheese and butter.

Although the health benefits of turmeric have been known for thousands of years in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, it has only recently been appreciated in Western medicine. Curcumin is a phenolic curcuminoid that is thought to be responsible for many of the health benefits of turmeric. It has potent and well-characterized antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Read on to learn more about the other ways in which this amazing spice can boost your health.

turmeric

 

Anticancer effects

Cancer development is a highly complex process that involves DNA damage, inflammation, and the disruption of cellular signaling and death pathways. Although the data are preliminary, there is a certain amount of excitement in the oncology community because curcumin can affect several of these pathways to exert anticancer effects.

Specific clinical trials in patients with cancer are ongoing, but the available results suggest that curcumin could be an effective treatment for multiple cancers, including multiple myeloma, head, and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and pancreatic, prostate, breast, colorectal, lung, and oral cancers [1].

 

Cognitive function

An exciting recent discovery is that turmeric could improve cognitive function in elderly individuals. An Australian study published in April 2016 administered placebo control or a form of curcumin to 96 community-dwelling older adults for 1 year. Various cognitive functions were tested before treatment and at 6- and 12-months. Subjects that received placebo exhibited a cognitive decline at 6 months, whereas those that received curcumin did not [2].

Although the Australian study was not definitive, the available data suggest that curcumin could have several anti-Alzheimer’s disease effects such as preventing the production and aggregation of β-amyloid in the brain and also regenerating brain cells [3]. Taken together, these data suggest that the regular intake of turmeric might reduce the aging-associated decline in cognitive function.

 brain-and-boosts

 

Increase testosterone levels

As anyone reading this blog understands, declining testosterone levels during normal aging are associated with several negative effects on health. Recent research has suggested that turmeric might increase testosterone levels in different ways. First, it can help reverse a number of conditions that can contribute to reduced low testosterone production, such as high cholesterol and dysregulated blood sugar.

The anti-oxidative effects of turmeric can also prevent oxidative damage to Leydig cells in the testis, which could, in turn, normalize with testosterone injections. In mice, turmeric could improve fertility by protecting the testes from various stressors [4, 5].

Who knew that eating curry could improve your testosterone levels and fertility!

 

Metabolic diseases

Curcumin exhibits a seemingly endless number of beneficial metabolic effects. For example:

  • It can increase the levels of HDL or good cholesterol and lower the levels of LDL or bad cholesterol [6]. This is important because low HDL levels and high LDL levels are risk factors for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.
  • It reduces blood glucose levels and improves glucose metabolism in rodent models, suggesting that it could be an effective treatment for diabetes [7].

 

How to make the most of your turmeric intake

Now you know about just some of the health benefits of turmeric, it is important to understand how to make the most of it. As with all drugs or supplements, the actions of turmeric are limited by its bioavailability, which is defined as the amount that is biologically available to exert its physiological effects. The bioavailability of a drug declines as it is metabolized in the liver, which is a particular concern with any drug or supplement that is administered orally.

One of the best ways to increase the bioavailability of curcumin is to consume turmeric-rich foods with black pepper. Black pepper contains a substance named piperine, which is a potent inhibitor of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (one of the liver enzymes responsible for drug metabolism) [8]. Indeed, eating even a small amount of piperine with turmeric could increase the bioavailability of turmeric by around 2000% [9].

Curcumin absorption can also be enhanced by consuming turmeric with fats because turmeric is fat-soluble. There are two ways to achieve this: ingest turmeric powder with a healthy fat such as olive oil, or consume natural turmeric root, which contains natural oils that promote its solubility.

Testosterone Injections – Curious about testosterone injections Therapy? Read more about what you can expect from this treatment and contact us for more information (866) 224-5698

References

  1. Gupta, S.C., S. Patchva, and B.B. Aggarwal, Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials. The AAPS Journal, 2013. 15(1): p. 195-218.
  2. Rainey-Smith, S.R., et al., Curcumin and cognition: a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of community-dwelling older adults. British Journal of Nutrition, 2016. 115(12): p. 2106-2113.
  3. Goozee, K.G., et al., Examining the potential clinical value of curcumin in the prevention and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Br J Nutr, 2016. 115(3): p. 449-65.
  4. Lin, C., et al., Curcumin dose-dependently improves spermatogenic disorders induced by scrotal heat stress in mice. Food Funct, 2015. 6(12): p. 3770-7.
  5. Coskun, G., et al., Ameliorating effects of curcumin on nicotine-induced mice testes. Turk J Med Sci, 2016. 46(2): p. 549-60.
  6. Yang, Y.S., et al., Lipid-lowering effects of curcumin in patients with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Phytother Res, 2014. 28(12): p. 1770-7.
  7. Nabavi, S.F., et al., Curcumin: a natural product for diabetes and its complications. Curr Top Med Chem, 2015. 15(23): p. 2445-55.
  8. Grill, A.E., B. Koniar, and J. Panyam, Co-delivery of natural metabolic inhibitors in a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of curcumin. Drug Deliv Transl Res, 2014. 4(4): p. 344-52.
  9. Shoba, G., et al., Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Planta Med, 1998. 64(4): p. 353-6.

June 27, 2016 by admin 1 Comment

Testosterone Effects on Prostate 0 (0)

Testosterone Effects on Prostate Health.
How That’s Changing.

Testosterone effects on prostate levels and its functionality have always been a delicate topic of conversation. There is a lot of controversy surrounding the different theories on its impact. We have all heard the stories and read the articles where Testosterone injections, or, really any form of testosterone therapy, are allegedly attributed to malignant side effects in the participants. What is most interesting is the notion there actually have not been many studies done focused on that particular reaction to therapy. By this we mean, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies as is the standard of our trusted Food and Drug administration’s qualification process.

  • testosterone effects on prostateWe do not want to give off the impression we share this recently accepted hypothesis, which suggests testosterone effects on prostate health do not necessarily have a correlation. However, it is important to shed light on the fact the medical community and its core beliefs and socially accepted diagnoses often shift, and dramatically. Also, as the world awakens, begins to ask more questions and not accepting the typical status quo, we’ve all become a bit more enlightened to the ways of the world. We’ve learned that big pharma and its main directors don’t necessarily have our health or us at the forefront of their decision-making. Many times profits interfere with factual descriptions and publicly distributed medicinal allocations. We must use discernment when we read data and, dig deeper if it’s a matter of personal importance. Everyone who searches finds…

Particularly men on testosterone therapy, they should do their best research to help them better understand the involved variables. Better understanding of testosterone effects on prostate health can help patients make the best determination, based on their personal considering factors.

A recent study led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center denoted men prescribed a minimum of 1 year of testosterone injections replacement therapy demonstrated no additional risk for prostate cancer. One researcher, in particular, Stacy Loeb,testosterone effects on prostate MD, MSc, who happens to be a urologist at NYU Langone Medical Center shared a different notion. She suggests physicians should continue to evaluate prostate cancer risk factors and better understand functionality and future health— such as age over 40, family history of the disease and black ancestry — among men prescribed testosterone therapy. Dr. Loeb said in a corresponding press release, “they should not hesitate to prescribe [testosterone therapy] to appropriate patients for fear of increasing prostate cancer risk.”

In their research to better understand testosterone injections effects on prostate health, Dr. Loeb and her contemporaries collected data from close to 25 million medical files on a group of men. These men were enumerated in the National Prostate Cancer Register and Prescribed Drug Register in Sweden.

  • testosterone effects on prostateThey were able to classify 38,570 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2009 and 2012. Of these men, 284 received testosterone therapy treatments prior to their prostate tissue diagnosis. These numbers were then compared to the results of 192,838 men who showed no development of cancer in the prostate. Most interestingly, 1,378 of those men had been on testosterone therapy.
  • Multivariable examination helped conclude no significant association between any kind of testosterone injections replacement therapy and prostate cancer risk (OR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.9-1.17). In fact, the results suggested a 35% increase in low-risk prostate cancer occurrence after the commencement of a testosterone therapy regimen (OR = 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16-1.56). Results also showed a lower risk of aggressive disease among men who used testosterone injections replacement therapy for more than a year (OR = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.37-0.67).

testosterone effects on prostateFrom this analysis, the demarcations indicating the lessened potential for testosterone injections therapy to have a negative side effect on the prostate are significantly prominent. Testosterone injections effects on prostate health and blood testing levels shown to have little to no association. That being said, until the concrete information has changed the national standard on this widespread opinion, AAI Rejuvenation Clinic will continue to supplement each one of our therapies with the necessary medicinal requirements currently utilized to maintain possible, unwanted side effects from interfering with a successful testosterone therapy treatment. If you have any questions or comments related to this subject, please fill out our short contact form and someone will reach you within 24 hours. Make sure to leave your phone number. You can also call us directly by dialing:

Testosterone Therapy Information

February 4, 2016 by admin 0 Comments

Testosterone Cypionate Description 0 (0)

Testosterone Cypionate description injections

Testosterone Cypionate Description injection for intramuscular injection contains Testosterone Cypionate which is the oil-soluble 17 (beta)- cyclopentyl propionate ester of the androgenic hormone testosterone. Testosterone Cypionate is a white or creamy white crystalline powder, odorless or nearly so and stable in air. It is insoluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol, chloroform, dioxane, ether, and soluble in vegetable oils. The chemical name for Testosterone Cypionate is androst-4-en-3-one,17-(3-cyclopentyl-1-oxopropoxy)-, (17β)-. Its molecular formula is C27H40O3, and the molecular weight 412.61.

The structural formula is represented below:

Testosterone Cypionate injection, USP is available in two strengths, 100 mg/mL and 200 mg/mL Testosterone Cypionate, USP.

Each mL of the 100 mg/mL solution contains:

Testosterone Cypionate……………………………………………………………………. 100 mg
Benzyl benzoate ……………………………………………………………………………… 0.1 mL
Cottonseed oil ………………………………………………………………………………… 736 mg
Benzyl alcohol (as preservative)………………………………………………………… 9.45 mg

Each mL of the 200 mg/mL solution contains:

Testosterone Cypionate……………………………………………………………………. 200 mg
Benzyl benzoate………………………………………………………………………………. 0.2 mL
Cottonseed oil………………………………………………………………………………… 560 mg

Benzyl alcohol (as preservative)………………………………………………………… 9.45 mg

Testosterone Cypionate – Clinical Pharmacology

Endogenous androgens are responsible for normal growth and development of the male sex organs and for maintenance of secondary sex characteristics. These effects include growth and maturation of the prostate, seminal vesicles, penis, and scrotum; development of male hair distribution, such as beard, pubic, chest, and axillary hair; laryngeal enlargement, vocal cord thickening, and alterations in body musculature and fat distribution. Drugs in this class also cause retention of nitrogen, sodium, potassium, and phosphorous, and decreased urinary excretion of calcium. Androgens have been reported to increase protein anabolism and decrease protein catabolism. Nitrogen balance is improved only when there is sufficient intake of calories and protein.

Androgens are responsible for the growth spurt of adolescence and for eventual termination of linear growth, brought about by fusion of the epiphyseal growth centers. In children, exogenous androgens accelerate linear growth rates but may cause a disproportionate advancement in bone maturation. Use over long periods may result in fusion of the epiphyseal growth centers and termination of the growth process. Androgens have been reported to stimulate the production of red blood cells by enhancing production of erythropoietic stimulation factor.

During exogenous administration of androgens, endogenous testosterone release is inhibited through feedback inhibition of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). At large doses of exogenous androgens, spermatogenesis may also be suppressed through feedback inhibition of pituitary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH).

There is a lack of substantial evidence that androgens are effective in fractures, surgery, convalescence, and functional uterine bleeding.

Pharmacokinetics

Testosterone esters are less polar than free testosterone. Testosterone esters in oil injected intramuscularly are absorbed slowly from the lipid phase; thus, Testosterone Cypionate can be given at intervals of two to four weeks.

Testosterone in plasma is 98 percent bound to a specific testosterone-estradiol binding globulin, and about 2 percent is free. Generally, the amount of this sex-hormone binding globulin in the plasma will determine the distribution of testosterone between free and bound forms, and the free testosterone concentration will determine its half-life.

About 90 percent of a dose of testosterone injections is excreted in the urine as glucuronic and sulfuric acid conjugates of testosterone and its metabolites; about 6 percent of a dose is excreted in the feces, mostly in the unconjugated form. Inactivation of testosterone occurs primarily in the liver. Testosterone therapy is metabolized to various 17-keto steroids through two different pathways.

The half-life of Testosterone Cypionate, when injected intramuscularly, is approximately eight days.

In many tissues, the activity of testosterone therapy appears to depend on reduction to dihydrotestosterone, which binds to cytosol receptor proteins. The steroid-receptor complex is transported to the nucleus where it initiates transcription events and cellular changes related to androgen action.

Indications and Usage for Testosterone Cypionate description

Testosterone Cypionate description injection is indicated for replacement therapy in the male in conditions associated with symptoms of deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone.

  • Primary hypogonadism (congenital or acquired)-testicular failure due to cryptorchidism, bilateral torsion, orchitis, vanishing testis syndrome; or orchidectomy.
  • Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (congenital or acquired): gonadotropin or LHRH deficiency, or pituitary-hypothalamic injury from tumors, trauma, or radiation.

Safety and efficacy of Testosterone Cypionate description in men with “age-related hypogonadism” (also referred to as “late-onset hypogonadism”) have not been established.

Contraindications

  1. Known hypersensitivity to the drug
  2. Males with carcinoma of the breast
  3. Males with known or suspected carcinoma of the prostate gland
  4. Women who are or who may become pregnant
  5. Patients with serious cardiac, hepatic or renal disease

Warnings

Hypercalcemia may occur in immobilized patients. If this occurs, the drug should be discontinued.

Prolonged use of high doses of androgens (principally the 17-α alkyl-androgens) has been associated with the development of hepatic adenomas, hepatocellular carcinoma, and peliosis hepatis —all potentially life-threatening complications.

Geriatric patients treated with androgens may be at an increased risk of developing prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic carcinoma although conclusive evidence to support this concept is lacking.

There have been postmarketing reports of venous thromboembolic events, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients using testosterone products, such as Testosterone Cypionate description. Evaluate patients who report symptoms of pain, edema, warmth, and erythema in the lower extremity for DVT and those who present with acute shortness of breath for PE. If a venous thromboembolic event is suspected, discontinue treatment with Testosterone Cypionate description and initiate appropriate workup and management.

Long term clinical safety trials have not been conducted to assess the cardiovascular outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in men. To date, epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled trials have been inconclusive for determining the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), such as non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and cardiovascular death, with the use of testosterone compared to non-use. Some studies, but not all, have reported an increased risk of MACE in association with the use of testosterone replacement therapy in men. Patients should be informed of this possible risk when deciding whether to use or to continue to use Testosterone Cypionate description.

Edema, with or without congestive heart failure, may be a serious complication in patients with preexisting cardiac, renal or hepatic disease.

Gynecomastia may develop and occasionally persists in patients being treated for hypogonadism.

The preservative benzyl alcohol has been associated with serious adverse events, including the “gasping syndrome”, and death in pediatric patients. Although normal therapeutic doses of this product ordinarily deliver amounts of benzyl alcohol that are substantially lower than those reported in association with the “gasping syndrome”, the minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which toxicity may occur is not known. The risk of benzyl alcohol toxicity depends on the quantity administered and the hepatic capacity to detoxify the chemical. Premature and low-birth weight infants may be more likely to develop toxicity.

Androgen therapy should be used cautiously in healthy males with delayed puberty. The effect on bone maturation should be monitored by assessing the bone age of the wrist and hand every 6 months. In children, androgen treatment may accelerate bone maturation without producing a compensatory gain in linear growth. This adverse effect may result in compromised adult stature. The younger the child the greater the risk of compromising final mature height.

This drug has not been shown to be safe and effective for the enhancement of athletic performance. Because of the potential risk of serious adverse health effects, this drug should not be used for such purpose.

Precautions

General

Patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy may develop acute urethral obstruction. Priapism or excessive sexual stimulation may develop. Oligospermia may occur after prolonged administration or excessive dosage. If any of these effects appear, the androgen should be stopped and if restarted, a lower dosage should be utilized.

Testosterone Cypionate description should not be used interchangeably with testosterone propionate description because of differences in duration of action.

Testosterone Cypionate description is not for intravenous use.

Information for Patients

Patients should be instructed to report any of the following: nausea, vomiting, changes in skin color, ankle swelling, too frequent or persistent erections of the penis.

Laboratory Tests

Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (to detect polycythemia) should be checked periodically in patients receiving long-term androgen administration.

Serum cholesterol may increase during androgen therapy.

Drug Interactions

Androgens may increase sensitivity to oral anticoagulants. The dosage of the anticoagulant may require a reduction in order to maintain satisfactory therapeutic hypoprothrombinemia.

Concurrent administration of oxyphenbutazone and androgens may result in elevated serum levels of oxyphenbutazone.

In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, insulin requirements.

Drug/Laboratory Test Interferences

Androgens may decrease levels of thyroxine-binding globulin, resulting in decreased total T4 serum levels and increased resin uptake of T3 and T4. Free thyroid hormone levels remain unchanged, however, and there is no clinical evidence of thyroid dysfunction.

Carcinogenesis

Animal data

Testosterone has been tested by subcutaneous injection and implantation in mice and rats. The implant induced cervical-uterine tumors in mice, which metastasized in some cases. There is suggestive evidence that injection of testosterone into some strains of female mice increases their susceptibility to hepatoma. Testosterone is also known to increase the number of tumors and decrease the degree of differentiation of chemically induced carcinomas of the liver in rats.

Human data

There are rare reports of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients receiving long-term therapy with androgens in high doses. Withdrawal of the drugs did not lead to regression of the tumors in all cases.

Geriatric patients treated with androgens may be at an increased risk of developing prostatic hypertrophy and prostatic carcinoma although conclusive evidence to support this concept is lacking.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category X. (See CONTRAINDICATIONS)

Benzyl alcohol can cross the placenta. See WARNINGS.

Nursing Mothers

Testosterone Cypionate description is not recommended for use in nursing mothers.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 12 years have not been established.

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse reactions in the male have occurred with some androgens:

Endocrine and urogenital: Gynecomastia and excessive frequency and duration of penile erections. Oligospermia may occur at high dosages.

Skin and Appendages: Hirsutism, male pattern of baldness, seborrhea, and acne.

Cardiovascular Disorders – myocardial infarction, stroke

Fluid and electrolyte disturbances: Retention of sodium, chloride, water, potassium, calcium, and inorganic phosphates.

Gastrointestinal: Nausea, cholestatic jaundice, alterations in liver function tests, rarely hepatocellular neoplasms and peliosis hepatis (see WARNINGS).

Hematologic: Suppression of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X, bleeding in patients on concomitant anticoagulant therapy, and polycythemia.

Nervous system: Increased or decreased libido, headache, anxiety, depression, and generalized paresthesia.

Allergic: Hypersensitivity, including skin manifestations and anaphylactoid reactions.

Vascular Disorders: venous thromboembolism

Miscellaneous: Inflammation and pain at the site of intramuscular testosterone injection.

Testosterone Therapy Information

July 28, 2015 by admin 0 Comments

Testosterone Levels Impact Sexual Function In Body 5 (1)

The influence of testosterone towards sexual function and libido isn’t emphasized enough. Even though it is implicated in study after study, the need for all persons to have their testosterone therapy levels properly balanced is essential. It’s an intricate part of a properly functioning endocrine system, which is critical for feeling healthy. Testosterone injections are among the most potent of libido-enhancing agents known to mankind. Testosterone therapy is effective in raising a person’s testosterone levels. This can certainly have a positive, “rising” effect on the desire for sexual contact.

(more…)

July 27, 2015 by Joseph Fermin 2 Comments

Can a Change in Hormones Cause Chronic Fatigue? 5 (1)

Could The Hormone explain
Your Chronic Fatigue?

Men experience a slow, yet steady decline in testosterone as they age. The continued loss of this male sex hormone is sometimes referred to as male menopause or andropause. Similar to female menopause, hormonal changes come with a number of undeniable symptoms, including Chronic Fatigue. These changes are not easy to accept or notice, however, they can have a gradual, crippling feeling.

Testosterone injections play a vital role in the body’s immune response. As testosterone levels decline, the body compensates by redistributing energy and resources to the immune system. This takes a considerable toll on energy levels resulting in testosterone-related Chronic Fatigue.

Additionally, another potential relationship between free testosterone and Chronic Fatigue is sleep disruption. It isn’t uncommon for a drop in testosterone levels to cause sleep disruptions in men and women. Testosterone is naturally released into the body in different periods throughout the day. However, it is mainly produced at night when you sleep. Usually, most production occurs approximately 3 hours into your sleep cycle. You probably get little to no quality sleep if you are suffering from low testosterone. Sleep deprivation causes your natural along with all the vigorous attributions associated with it.

The loss of energy, lack of sleep, Chronic Fatigue and other symptoms linked with diminishing testosterone levels is not something you have to incorporate into your lifestyle. Fortunately, this can be improved. Here at AAI, we delve deeper into each of our patient’s history, goals, and lifestyle. We recognize that everyone is a unique individual and our bodies work differently. AAI takes this into account when we develop and organize your profile and pharmaceutical protocol. There is no one size fits all remedy. A thorough evaluation of your blood work will reveal areas of focus, signs of potential health concerns, as well as ailments you may be experiencing. Testosterone replacement therapy in conjunction with supplemental pharmaceuticals can drastically increase energy levels and reduce Chronic Fatigue. Testosterone Therapy has also been proven to improve mood, bone density, strengthen the immune system, reduce body fat, improve muscle mass, and reduce feelings of depression.

Like any use of medication, testosterone replacement therapy does not come without risks. Before injectable Testosterone replacement therapy is started, you must complete our Medical History Form, Blood Work, and Physical Examination in order to rule out any possible contradictions to Testosterone therapy. Blood Work is essential in determining your free testosterone levels. This process can be facilitated close to your home. At AAI, we feel it is imperative to continue to monitor hormone levels throughout the duration of your treatment. We have implemented various programs to help facilitate those follow up’s. You do not have to schedule an appointment to go to a lab to have blood drawn for these follow-ups. We provide you with a 7-day mouth swab kit. This provides our physician with data over a consecutive 7- day period of time for remarkable accuracy. It assures you are getting the most out of your therapy and that any required adjustments are made accordingly. This is essential to ensure that you are enjoying all the benefits that you wanted and deserve your testosterone therapy while avoiding any potential health risks.

**NOTE**  The content contained in this blog is subject to interpretation and is the opinion of the content writer.  We do not claim it to be fact.  We encourage you to consult a medical doctor before taking any prescribed medications or supplements.

At AAI Rejuvenation Clinic, we advise anyone to think seriously about beginning Hormone treatment if there is no medical need for it. However, we will take every precaution to ensure that you read all the positive benefits from your program by providing the latest at-home hormonal mouth-swab testing. This will ensure we are continually monitoring your progress and aware of any negative side effects. Fill out the Medical History Form or call us at (866) 224-5698