Look Your Best, Feel Your Best, and Be Your Best With AAIClinics
Call Us
(866) 224-5698
Mon-Fri: 10am-6pm
Sat-Sun: Closed
May 20, 2018 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

To Understand the Hormonal Imbalance in Women 5 (4)

To Understand the Hormonal Imbalance in Women

Hormonal Imbalance

Hormonal Imbalance and why can it be so difficult or impossible to clear up acne? As you probably know, you’re hormonal and acne has a vast array of potential causes.

For some people putting cream or simple dietary changes can clear up their skin (Yeah!), but for others, it can be a long and hard arduous journey to clear up.

However, it doesn’t have to be a long struggle for clear skin if you can pinpoint the underlying triggers. Hormonal Imbalance is a cause of acne, and I’m going to talk about the topic in detail so you can understand or have an idea why this can occur, and how you can treat it!

Hormones are abundant when we are young in the body, always involved in complex and far-reaching processes. No Hormonal Imbalance acts in isolation; they work together, so when one is out of balance, it can disrupt the whole endocrine system or worse. This article will discuss Hormonal Imbalance related to pre-menstrual and acne problems.

A brief overview of the menstrual cycle in women and its Hormonal Imbalance, to understand the Hormonal Imbalance in women, it’s essential first to know what hormonal balance is and what should occur ideally.

Your period is a monthly report on your health, and if everything is in balance, you should expect to have an average length cycle, with little-to-no PMS symptoms and a painless period without heavy bleeding. You might be thinking ‘As if that exists?!’ right now, but unfortunately, so many women experience Hormonal Imbalance, stress, nutritional deficiencies, and general ill-health, that things like PMS and period pain have become the norm. PMS is common, but it’s not normal. So, let’s get into it:

Menstrual cycle will starts on the first day of your period bleed, right until the first day of your next period. An average cycle length is anywhere between 23 and 35 days in length and varies from woman to woman. Although the menstrual cycle based on 28 days, Now this is not the case always. Anything outside this 23-35 day cycle length will be considered abnormal or will often indicate a Hormonal Imbalance dysfunction along the line in life.

Hormonal Imbalance

 

There are many hormones involved in the body that can regulate the menstrual cycle, but (so it doesn’t get too confusing!) the main ones are:

  1. Estrogen
  2. Progesterone
  3. Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)
  4. Luteinizing hormone (LH)
  5. Testosterone

Testosterone and other androgens, If implantation of an egg occurs, the above hormones kick in to promote all the requirements for a healthy pregnancy. If fertilization does not happen, after ovulation the uterus lining will shed to make way for a new uterine lining for next ovulation (the body is always hoping!).

Ovulation is meant to occur smack-bang in the middle of your menstrual cycle- at text-book day 14 if you have a 28-day cycle. You will usually get your period 14 days later of ovulation, so if your menstrual cycle is 25 days, you may ovulate on day 11.

The Ovulation shares the menstrual period into two stages: the first phase is when estrogen is the star, and the second stage focuses on progesterone. Progesterone usually is secreted from the ovarian follicle after ovulation (a tiny bit released from your adrenal glands), which develops into a sac called the corpus luteum. Therefore, to have adequate levels of progesterone, you need to have ovulated.

Now, central to the discussion of hormonal balance because many women don’t ovulate every menstrual cycle due to stress, illness, and nutritional inadequacies. Estrogen and progesterone-like to work together in balance, and the ratio between the levels of these hormones is critical. Estrogen is ‘proliferative,’ meaning it promotes cells growth (things like breast and hip development in puberty) and promotes smooth, plump skin, healthy bones, and arteries. Progesterone is ‘secrete,’ meaning that it promotes vascular development and the maintenance of the uterine lining after ovulation.

Hormonal Imbalance

Hormonal Imbalance can occur in women when:

  1. Estrogen levels are high or low, and progesterone is normal
  2. Estrogen levels are high or low, and progesterone is low
  3. Estrogen levels are reasonable, and progesterone levels are low
  4. Pre-Menstrual, Acne, and Estrogen levels
  5. Pre-Menstrual, Acne, and Testosterone levels

Pre-menstrual and acne can occur anywhere in the 1-2 weeks before your period, now this acne is related to the hormonal of a woman’s menstrual period and includes the hormones testosterone, estrogen, progesterone also some androgens and others.

After the ovulation, in the second part of the menstrual cycle the amount of hormones increases, because we know we have testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone. Estrogen will naturally start to decline soon while progesterone begins to rise.

But how do estrogen levels drop?

Too high or too little estrogen can disrupt the menstrual cycle and can impact progesterone levels by impairing ovulation. So, we want estrogen to be at just the right amount- not too high and not too low. Estrogen is broken down (metabolized) through the liver and eliminated via the kidneys and intestines (in your pee and poop). If estrogen is not working or metabolized correctly, then the levels build and build which can result in estrogen excess. Too much estrogen and specific metabolites of estrogen can cause inflammation. Here is where high estrogen levels can trigger pre-menstrual acne.

The cause? Too much re-circulating estrogen and not enough proper liver detoxification going on and extra estrogen can turn in testosterone.

Pre-Menstrual and acne are a sign that your liver needs some love!

Higher amounts of hormones place a higher burden on the liver’s detoxification pathways in the body. Don’t forget! The liver has to metabolize every single thing or substance that enters into our bodies food, environmental toxins, metabolic waste products, red blood cells and much more. It also metabolizes our hormones, especially estrogen (and all the estrogen metabolites).

Some are signs that your liver needs some support or attention:

  1. Headaches and migraines
  2. Constipation
  3. Acne
  4. Eczema
  5. Irritability
  6. PMS
  7. Nausea and indigestion
  8. Sinus congestion (sinusitis, rhinitis)
  9. Allergies
  10. Metabolic syndrome
  11. Insulin resistance

How can you help your liver and make sure you’re eliminating excess hormones?

Make sure you’re pooping at least once per day. If your bowels are congested, this increases your overall toxic load, which has to get processed in the liver.

Eat enough fiber- we require at least 30 grams per day, and many of us reach about half of this. Thread connects into metabolized hormones, cholesterol and moves them out of the body via the intestines. Up your intake of veggies, seeds, beans, legumes, nuts and gluten-free grains.

Cruciferous vegetables contain glucosinolates, which are broken down to indole-3-carbinol. This compound supports the detoxification of estrogens. So eat more broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and kale every day.

Eat bitter foods- bitter greens like the rocket (arugula), endive and bitter lettuces stimulate the production of digestive secretions, such bile in the liver. Bile contains metabolized hormones and waste products, so we make sure it leaves the body, so the liver can continually process new fresh bile and help the organization.

Include rosemary and turmeric in your diet as much as possible. This help reduces inflammation in the body, liver and also support detoxification pathways or microbiota.

Make sure you don’t have any hidden food intolerances. These will cause the body inflammation in the GIT and place an extra burden on your liver.

Balance your gut bugs! Your microbiota (intestinal bacteria) also play a significant role in metabolizing of estrogens. Consume fermented foods with each meal: fermented veggies and kombucha, yogurts, kefir, sauerkraut, and feed your bugs with probiotic fibers: green bananas, cold potatoes, whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables.

Acne, Pre-Menstrual, and Progesterone testosterone, and estrogen

Now If your progesterone levels are out of balance, this can also lead to hormonal acne, as other symptoms related to PMS and infertility. Balance progesterone levels have been shown to help block the activity of DHT, and the most potent of androgens, also this present in the skin and contributes to the formation of acne.

We have discussed this earlier in this blog, progesterone mainly produced once ovulation has occurred. The egg released from a structure called the follicle, and once ovulation has occurred, the follicle forms the ‘corpus luteum,’ which is a secretory endocrine structure that produces most of our progesterone.

Progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen work together in a balanced ratio, and when this occurs there will be no more PMS symptoms, fertility will be optimal, and you will feel young. This Issues will arise when a woman fails to ovulate her self, or her body does not have the requirements to maintain and therefore her progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen levels are insufficient.

The reasons why women fail to ovulate and why?

High estrogen levels block the hormonal cascade that triggers ovulation, Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), Nutritional insufficiency, Low body fat percentage, Stress and Ovarian failure and menopause.

The Insufficient nutrients required to maintain the corpus luteum and produce hormones, Stress, and Inflammation

How can these issues be addressed and ensure we make and maintain progesterone?

We have to ensure to balance our nutritional intake in our body. The corpus luteum requires sufficient levels of magnesium, zinc, iron, B vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C and iron (for a start).

We also need fats to make our hormones, so it is vital to include healthy fats in your diet. Manage your stress! Stress responses burn through nutrients faster than anything else, so if you chronically stressed you would be depriving your reproductive system of the nutrients, it needs to perform. Stress also inhibits the HPOA axis (hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis). The hypothalamus (a master control center in your brain) needs to convinced that you are safe and nourishing for you to reproduce (which is the ultimate function of your reproductive system).

Acne can associate with insulin resistance and PCOS will primary be due to impaired glucose metabolism, so this is the critical area to address. Insulin promotes androgen production, which is a driving factor in the production of acne. Necessary but effective strategies to combat this include eliminating all refined and added sugar from your diet and eating more protein, fats and complex carbohydrates. Supplementing with chromium, magnesium and B vitamins will also support proper glucose metabolism and insulin function.

184312111
November 14, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

The Danger of Low Testosterone in Women 5 (2)

LOW TESTOSTERONE IN WOMEN’S HEALTH

Low Testosterone in Women’s are full with Television ads, internet ads, magazine ads and radio ads they are all targeting men with products that addressing low testosterone that occurs as we age, but nothing is directing or teaching women about low testosterone, despite being classified as a male hormone, women also produce testosterone.

Testosterone therapy in women has become a hot-button problem issue as women begin to realize the risk of low testosterone levels drop with age for women as well as men. testosterone therapy is used to treat the symptoms of testosterone deficiency in perimenopause, premenopause and postmenopausal in women, as research continues to show that healthy testosterone levels are essential for the physical and mental health of both in women and men as well.

Low Testosterone in Women

Which Women’s Can Be at Risk for Low Testosterone

The ovaries are responsible for producing both testosterone and estrogen, as the ovaries age, they produce less estrogen and testosterone. As women enter peri-menopause and pre-menopause, testosterone will be diminished by the age of 30’s, and once a women reach full menopause, it’s common for them to produce 75% less testosterone than they did in the there 21’s. Every woman becomes at risk of low testosterone as she ages, and women who go through hysterectomy or oophorectomy have an even higher chance of dealing or having with low testosterone levels.

What are the Symptoms of Peri-Menopause?

Peri-menopause occurs when a woman’s hormonal cycle transitions toward pre-menopause and infertility begin. It often starts in women in their late-30’s and can last for up to 11 years; the average duration is ~4 years. During the peri-menopause, menses become less frequent, and the symptoms typically associated with menopause.

The most common symptoms of peri-menopause are:

  • Hot flashes and Reduced sex drive
  • Discomfort and dryness during sex
  • Fatigue and Problems sleeping
  • Mood swings and Migraines
  • Severe premenstrual syndrome
  • Irregular periods and Breast tenderness
  • An urgent need to urinate
  • Urine leakage, particularly when sneezing or coughing

Dangers of Testosterone Deficiencies in Women as we Age

Women who begin experiencing low testosterone may notice many of the same symptoms that men deal with.
With Low levels of testosterone in women often lead to an increased risk of :

  • Reduced fertility
  • Increased risk of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
  • Psoriasisosteoporosis, since low T levels can leach away strength from the skeleton.

Low levels can also lead to an increased risk of gaining weight since low testosterone has linked to control the fat mass in women.

A report published in the Journal for Women’s Health even showed that low testosterone in women’s could be a risk factor for heart disease. Since the number one killer is a cardiovascular disease in women and men, this is the importance of balanced your hormones, including testosterone, progesterone, and estrogen,

What’re The Benefits of Progesterone, Estrogen, and Testosterone Therapy?
Women With Low Progesterone May Experience Symptoms As:

  • Insomnia, trouble sleeping, waking up in the middle of the night
  • Fuzzy Thinking” ­ is misplacing keys, forgetting where the car is parked, feeling overwhelmed.
  • Worsening PMS with more substantial, more painful periods
  • Headaches are increasing in frequency, new onset migraines.

Testosterone is an essential as a woman’s testosterone level declines in peri­menopause.
Women may experience symptoms such as;

  • Decreased libido
  • Inability to orgasm
  • Reduced the sense of well­being, energy, and sex drive
  • Dysphoria and much more

The final hormone is perimenopause is estrogen. This will occurs late in perimenopause, signaling the transition into early premenopause or menopause.
Symptoms of low estrogen can include:

  • Hot Flashes
  • Night Sweats
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Thinning, drooping skin
  • Recurrent urinary tract infections

Testosterone has the potential to relieve these symptoms. Studies show that treating women with testosterone can significantly improve their sex drive.

For women going through perimenopause, and premenopause or menopause, testosterone therapy often provides symptom relief. Studies show that testosterone therapy in women can relieve the symptoms of menopause, including:

  • Urinary urgency
  • Incontinence
  • Vaginal dryness
  • and hot flashes

An increasing number of women are being diagnosed with low testosterone in women’s. Although men make and need a lot more testosterone than women, it is still very important for a normal androgen response in women.

Even though many of the risks of low testosterone in women’s are similar in men, there are several female-specific risks:

  • Reduced fertility
  • Increased risk of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
  • Psoriasis

Because low testosterone in women’s generally occurs around middle age, it is often accompanied by low estrogen at the pre-menopausal period. This combination of two low hormones leads to a high rate of heart disease, bone fractures, and vaginal atrophy.

July 12, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 3 Comments

What does the Bioidentical Hormone 5 (1)

What Does the Bioidentical Hormone Program Involve

Bioidentical Hormone GHRP-2 is a synthetic analog of the peptide hormone ghrelin. Ghrelin is a small 28 amino acid peptide that is produced by the stomach in response to hunger. It also activates the human growth hormone secretagogue receptor (also known as the ghrelin receptor) to stimulate GH production and metabolism. GHRP-2 functions similarly to stimulate the hypothalamus and increase the production of endogenous GH from the pituitary gland; synthesis then slowly drops back to baseline by the third hour after administration. This more closely replicates the pulsatile nature of endogenous GH production, which makes it advantageous and potentially safer compared with synthetic HGH use.

(more…)

November 8, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 6 Comments

What are the Symptoms of Peri-menopause 5 (1)

What is the Peri-menopause?

As women, our bodies go through dramatic changes as we age, and these changes are caused by our hormones. Perimenopause is the time of a woman’s life when her hormonal cycle slows, her fertility reduces, and periods become less common as she heads toward menopause. It can be a very stressful time because it affects her physical and emotional state.

To understand what causes the peri-menopause and how to best reduce the symptoms, it is important to appreciate the changes that occur in the female body during aging. There are four main stages in a woman’s hormonal life:

Puberty

Puberty is the process of sexual maturation; it normally begins around the age of 11 and lasts for several years. Generally, it begins with breast development, followed by the growth of pubic hair and finally menstruation.

The Reproductive Years

The reproductive years begin with the onset of menstruation and persist until peri-menopause. They are characterized by the menstrual cycle, which controls a woman’s fertility. The menstrual cycle is primarily governed by fluctuations in the levels of the hormones that control ovulation and regulate the thickness of the uterine lining to prepare for the implantation of a possible fertilized egg.

  • The hypothalamus secretes gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).
  • FSH stimulates follicles in the ovaries to prepare an egg for maturation and release, which includes the secretion of estrogen to prepare the uterus for implantation.
  • LH triggers ovulation, or the release of an egg from the ovaries, which results in the production and release of progesterone and additional estrogen to prepare the body for fertilization and pregnancy [1].

Menopause

Perimenopause

Perimenopause occurs when a woman’s hormonal cycle transitions toward menopause and infertility begin. It often starts in women in their late-40’s and can last for up to 11 years; the average duration is ~4 years. During the peri-menopause, menses become less common and the symptoms typically associated with menopause (discussed below) begin.

The changes that occur during menopause are caused by altered hormone levels. A woman remains fertile only as long as her ovaries produce and secrete eggs via a process known as ovulation. Since there are a finite number of eggs, female fertility essentially has an expiration date. The production of estrogen and progesterone relies upon ovulation, which means that hormone production is diminished significantly once eggs are no longer released.

Hormonally, the peri-menopause is defined by persistently increased LH and FSH levels and very low estrogen and progesterone levels. Testosterone secretion can also decline by approximately 50% during peri-menopause [2].

Menopause

Menopause officially starts one year after a woman’s last period. Menopausal women produce very high levels of FSH but low levels of estrogen and progesterone. They are no longer fertile and are at a higher risk of diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease because of the reduced hormone concentrations [3].perimenopause

What are the Symptoms of Peri-Menopause?

The most common symptoms of peri-menopause (http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide-perimenopause#2) are:

  • Hot flashes
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Discomfort and dryness during sex
  • Fatigue
  • Problems sleeping
  • Mood swings
  • Migraines
  • Severe premenstrual syndrome
  • Irregular periods
  • Breast tenderness
  • An urgent need to urinate
  • Urine leakage, particularly when sneezing or coughing

Because some of these symptoms can be caused by other hormone-related conditions, we always recommend getting your hormone levels checked to ensure that you receive an accurate diagnosis. If you visit AAI Rejuvenation Clinic with the above symptoms, we will measure the levels of your sex hormones as part of our work up. This will allow us to develop a specific program to make you feel like your old self.

Alleviate Your Symptoms with Hormone-Replacement Therapy (HRT)

Unfortunately, the transition from fertility to menopause is part of natural aging and it happens to all women. Although the symptoms of perimenopause can be severe, it is possible to reduce their severity and be able to function fully.

For many years, HRT was used to alleviate the symptoms of peri-menopause and reduce the risk of mortality, dementia, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis in aging women. Although a now-revised link to an increased risk of breast cancer led to a temporary decline in the use of HRT, it is again the number one treatment and disease-prevention strategy used in peri-menopausal and menopausal women [4].

As the name suggests, the aim of HRT is to replace the hormones no longer being produced naturally. The hormones are often delivered in tablet form, although transdermal Testosterone Patches, creams, Testosterone Gels, and implants can also be used. There are four major forms of HRT:

  • Estrogen alone
  • Estrogen and progesterone
  • Gonadomimetics, which contain estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone; an example is a tibolone
  • SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators)

Because HRT can restore your hormone levels to those you experienced when you were young, it can relieve your symptoms and also reduce the risk of diseases associated with low hormone levels such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Although some studies have suggested that HRT could protect against stroke, diabetes, cognitive aging, and mood, these effects are more controversial [5]. Nevertheless, the clinical evidence supporting the beneficial effects of HRT in cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis is convincing:

  • HRT reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases. An evidence-based study investigated the evidence from randomized clinical trials and concluded that HRT could reduce the risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease in women within 10 years of the menopause aged <60 years [5]. However, there is evidence that HRT should be avoided in older women because it might increase the risk of coronary events [6].
  • HRT reduces the risk of osteoporosis. One of the best-known benefits of HRT is its ability to inhibit bone loss and reduce the incidence of fractures in perimenopausal women; estrogen therapy might be more effective than combined estrogen-progesterone treatment [7].

In addition to these clinical effects, HRT alleviates the symptoms of peri-menopause including skin and hair complaints and sexual symptoms [8], as well as hot flashes [9].

Measure your hormone levels today and find out if HRT could improve your day-to-day life.

References

  • [1] R.E. Jones, K.H. Lopez, Human reproductive biology, Academic Press2006.
  • [2] S.J. Richardson, The biological basis of the menopause, Bailliere’s clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 7 (1993) 1-16.
  • [3] L. Jia, H. Jin, J. Zhou, L. Chen, Y. Lu, Y. Ming, Y. Yu, A potential anti-tumor herbal medicine, Corilagin, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth through blocking the TGF-beta signaling pathways, BMC complementary, and alternative medicine, 13 (2013) 33.
  • [4] R.A. Lobo, J.H. Pickar, J.C. Stevenson, W.J. Mack, H.N. Hodis, Back to the future: Hormone replacement therapy as part of a prevention strategy for women at the onset of menopause, Atherosclerosis, 254 (2016) 282-290.
  • [5] R. Sood, S.S. Faubion, C.L. Kuhle, J.M. Thielen, L.T. Shuster, Prescribing menopausal hormone therapy: an evidence-based approach, International Journal of Women’s Health, 6 (2014) 47-57.
  • [6] R.A. Lobo, Where are we 10 years after the Women’s Health Initiative?, The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 98 (2013) 1771-1780.
  • [7] The 2012 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society, Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19 (2012) 257-271.
  • [8] D. Rouskova, K. Mittmann, U. Schumacher, H. Dietrich, T. Zimmermann, Effectiveness, tolerability and acceptance of an oral estradiol/levonorgestrel formulation for the treatment of menopausal complaints: a non-interventional observational study over six cycles of 28 days, Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 30 (2014) 712-716.
  • [9] N. Santoro, C.N. Epperson, S.B. Mathews, Menopausal Symptoms and Their Management, Endocrinology and metabolism clinics of North America, 44 (2015) 497-515.

July 11, 2016 by admin 1 Comment

Testosterone Affects Women’s Libido and nervous system 5 (1)

Testosterone Affects Womens Libido Too.

Testosterone affects on women's libidoTestosterone affects womens libido in a positive way. However, low testosterone is women significantly overlooked as a treatment to help stimulate a depleting sexual desire in women. Most of the time we think about testosterone injections, we mainly think about men. Every facet we understand of testosterone therapy seems to be a fitting adjective for describing a typical, popularly-socially accepted man. The truth of the matter is, testosterone affects women’s libido in much the same way that it does men. In fact, testosterone as a whole serves as a natural, sexual motivator in all species.

Of course, women do not need nearly as much testosterone as men do:

  • • A healthy man’s testosterone levels typically range between 500 ng/dl and 900 ng/dl.
  • • A womans testosterone levels, when she usually feels most comfortable, should range between 9 ng/dl and 41 ng/dl.

A sizable difference. We must remember, though; hormones are not “drugs.” They do not affect the central nervous system. There must be a balance. Over excessive dosages do not inspire a higher sexual appetite. In fact, the biological retribution may be to lower the need for sex even further. A specialized hormone doctor should be the one to organize a testosterone program for any man or woman feeling that their need for sexual stimulation has reduced to some bothersome level.

Well, let us discuss this in further detail. How testosterone affects womens libido is important to understand before considering it as an alternative.

A recently published thesis inspired at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, in an attempt to better understand how testosterone affects women’s libido, determined testosterone inspires both a physiological and a psychological effect on women’s sexuality.

Part of the study, inspired by gynecologist Angelique Flöter Rådestad has a short dissertation by her. There she considered the effects of combined testosterone and estrogen therapy. She focused on sexuality, overall well-being, and the rigidity and actual molecular consistency of the skeletal system in the body in women who have had their uterus and ovaries removed.

Introspectively, there have been various past studies that have positively indicated that hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone, have valuable benefits to bettering one’s quality of life after menopause. However, a minimal amount is understood about the role of testosterone and what affect low testosterone insufficiency has on a woman. As you can already determine, it was necessary to understand how testosterone affects womens libido. In fact, this needed to be considered and studied a long time ago.

  • • When a woman has to have both ovaries removed, her production of testosterone is reduced by half, which can affect her sexual desire, function and overall health and well-being.

The Swedish study validates that women who participate in a combination treatment, which would include estrogen and testosterone for a consecutive 6 months, benefited from a measurably significant improvement in certain aspects of their sexual function. The study also denoted that endogenous testosterone played a very active role in arousal, sexual desire, and satisfaction.

  • • Properly administered testosterone protocols demonstrated to increased women’s interest and joy in sex. Improvements in these areas of sexual function help with a womens overall level of satisfaction, which in turn adds to maximizing a positive quality of life.
  • • Combined testosterone/estrogen treatment and placebo/estrogen improved psychological well-being just as much.

Further delving into the research, the study’s involved physicians were able to determine that supplemental testosterone promoted an advantageous effect on musculature and bone metabolism. Conversely, a bit of a negative effect was seen relative to blood fats. Side effects that included any hair growth or acne were rare. These usually only surface when patients misappropriate their treatment. Following the doctor’s orders and following up during the course of the therapy is the safest way to ensure keeping away any side effects.

Summing-up, the above study determined conclusively that importance of testosterone in womens sexuality. The positive effects on the bones and body structure can also be of significant consideration for women who have had their ovaries removed.

Now that you better understand how testosterone affects womens libido and sexual function, do you think it is time to check your testosterone levels? We can help. Take the first step with us. We help you intelligently

Testosterone Therapy Information

  1. What Is Testosterone?
  2. Testosterone Therapy Info
  3. Testosterone Injections
  4. symptoms of Low Testosterone
  5. causes of Low Testosterone
  6. Low Testosterone in Men
  7. Low Testosterone in Women
  8. Low Testosterone
  9. Testosterone Cypionate
  10. Testosterone Propionate
  11. Testosterone Enanthate
  12. Testosterone Patches
  13. Testosterone Gels
  14. Testosterone Boosters
  15. Side Effects of Testosterone

February 16, 2016 by admin 3 Comments

Perimenopause in Women 5 (1)

perimenopause

Perimenopause: Hormone Imbalance in Women; discussing the three main hormones and their impact.

Perimenopause can easily sneak up on the unsuspecting woman. It’s a difficult truth but, our reality. It had been 2 years since I had last seen Suzy in my office. A pretty, vicarious mother of two teenage boys, I noticed, as I entered the room that she had added some weight to her midsection, and she was not her usual bubbly self. “Dr. Kauffman, I don’t know what is wrong with me! I am eating the same and exercising every day, but I keep gaining weight! She continued “ But that is the least of it, for the first time in my life, I have insomnia! And my poor husband, I have no sex drive!”.

I suggested to Suzy, that at 45, these symptoms suggested perimenopause. “But doctor, my periods are regular, they have even gotten a lot heavier lately.

I explained to Suzy that women have 3 main hormones that decrease during the transition into menopause; estrogen, testosterone, and progesterone. The first hormones that decrease are progesterone and testosterone, while estrogen levels remain fairly stable. This decrease typically starts in the early to mid forties, on setting the beginning stages of perimenopause.

With progesterone decreasing while estrogen remains the same, this creates a relative excess of estrogen sometimes referred to as “Estrogen Dominance”. This frequently is the reason for increasingly heavy periods experienced by women in their forties.

Women with low progesterone may experience symptoms such as;

*Insomnia _ trouble sleeping, waking up in the middle of the night

*Fuzzy Thinking” ­ misplacing keys, forgetting where the car is parked, feeling overwhelmed.

*Worsening PMS with heavier, more painful periods

*Headaches increasing in frequency, new onset migraines.

Testosterone is an important hormone for women as well as men. As a woman’s testosterone level declines in peri­menopause, she may experience symptoms such as;

Decreased libido

● Inability to orgasm

● decreased sense of well­being, energy, and sex drive

● dysphoria

The final hormone to decrease in perimenopause is estrogen. this occurs late in perimenopause, signaling the transition into early menopause. Symptoms of low estrogen can include:

● Hot Flashes

● Night Sweats

● Pain during intercourse

● Thinning, drooping skin

● Recurrent urinary tract infections

Women are grossly underrated in perimenopause. It is not uncommon for women to suffer for years. Left untreated, these hormonal imbalances can cause a great deal of stress to a woman’s life. It can damage one’s life emotionally, physically and mentally.

Fortunately, it is possible to replace the hormones that decrease during perimenopause and menopause. Just like someone suffering from hypothyroidism, women who are suffering from low estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone can have these hormones replaced. The first step is to schedule blood work so that you can be evaluated for hormonal deficiencies.

By Dr. Deborah Kauffman