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October 25, 2018 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

Male Menopause or Low-T is No longer Just for Older Men 5 (6)

Male Menopause or Low Testosterone, In our practice of low hormones, I’ve noticed that there is an increasing number of younger guys, as much as older men are complaining of sexual concerns and problems, like diminished libido and erectile difficulties.

Does some clinician believe that factors like obesity, stress and inadequate sleep probably play a role in such issues in the production of your hormones, and isn’t purely a lifestyle problem or question? These factors are also common or possible causes of low levels of testosterone, which can influence the role of sexual function problems.

book-free

Low Testosterone” is still most common in men over 30, also known male menopause or andropause, as you gradual testosterone decrease in testosterone typically occurs steadily over time. In fact, “after age 30, men experience a 3% reduction in testosterone every year,” the naturopathic doctor said. “According to Michael A. Werner, MD, a specialist in male infertility, erectile dysfunction and sexual dysfunction, male menopause or andropause occurs in 2% to 5% of men ages 40 to 49, rises to 6% to 30% in men ages 50 to 59, reaches 20% to 45% in men 60 to 69, and is found in up to 70% of men of ages 70 to 79 experience andropause with low testosterone.”

So that being said, low testosterone isn’t necessarily just a consequence of aging. Some factors can have an impact on a man’s testosterone levels. Low Testosterone has many factors influence sexual health, including mood, energy level, nutrition, genetics, age, health conditions, and medications, and more commonly seen in older men or such as:

Motivation: As testosterone production declines so do energy-boosting components and restful sleep, thus producing decreased motivation.

libido: Low levels of testosterone cause a reduction in sex drive.

Depression: When a person experiences low testosterone levels it alters hormone production, which can lead to depression.

Erectile Dysfunction: Testosterone supplementation can be used to reverse or correct low testosterone-induced erectile dysfunction.

Fatigue: A decrease in testosterone levels leads to hormonal changes, which can cause fatigue, also can be exacerbated by low testosterone-induced sleep loss, which can quickly turn into a vicious cycle.

High Cholesterol: High cholesterol is a silent killer that can lead to a variety of heart conditions. Testosterone injections, when used in a proper protocol, can lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and triglyceride levels.

Low Energy & Fatigue: Symptoms of aging can be a direct result of diminishing levels of testosterone or (Low-T) in the body. As we age, our bodies produce less and less testosterone, causing low energy and fatigue.

Memory Loss: Some recent evidence suggests that testosterone might help prevent and treat the effects of brain aging. Some patients treated with testosterone injections expressed a palpable increase in their cognitive function, short- and long-term memory, and vocabulary improvements.

Thyroid: The hormones produced by the thyroid and adrenal glands regulate vital processes throughout the body. If thyroid hormone and cortisol levels are abnormal, the rest of the body does not function properly. Some studies have suggested a link between low thyroid function and low testosterone levels.

Weight Gain: The production of certain hormones decreases after the age of 30. The lean body mass of some organs also starts to decline, whereas fat mass increases. Testosterone administration can affect your body composition.

One option for low testosterone is prescription is testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), “Testosterone, like all hormones, has multiple actions on many body functions and the mind,” that being said.

“In my opinion, it should be taken — and prescribed — only to correct a deficiency documented by appropriate blood tests.” Otherwise, We recommend “an integrative approach to sexual health” that assesses all the many factors that affect testosterone.

May 20, 2018 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

To Understand the Hormonal Imbalance in Women 5 (4)

To Understand the Hormonal Imbalance in Women

Hormonal Imbalance

Hormonal Imbalance and why can it be so difficult or impossible to clear up acne? As you probably know, you’re hormonal and acne has a vast array of potential causes.

For some people putting cream or simple dietary changes can clear up their skin (Yeah!), but for others, it can be a long and hard arduous journey to clear up.

However, it doesn’t have to be a long struggle for clear skin if you can pinpoint the underlying triggers. Hormonal Imbalance is a cause of acne, and I’m going to talk about the topic in detail so you can understand or have an idea why this can occur, and how you can treat it!

Hormones are abundant when we are young in the body, always involved in complex and far-reaching processes. No Hormonal Imbalance acts in isolation; they work together, so when one is out of balance, it can disrupt the whole endocrine system or worse. This article will discuss Hormonal Imbalance related to pre-menstrual and acne problems.

A brief overview of the menstrual cycle in women and its Hormonal Imbalance, to understand the Hormonal Imbalance in women, it’s essential first to know what hormonal balance is and what should occur ideally.

Your period is a monthly report on your health, and if everything is in balance, you should expect to have an average length cycle, with little-to-no PMS symptoms and a painless period without heavy bleeding. You might be thinking ‘As if that exists?!’ right now, but unfortunately, so many women experience Hormonal Imbalance, stress, nutritional deficiencies, and general ill-health, that things like PMS and period pain have become the norm. PMS is common, but it’s not normal. So, let’s get into it:

Menstrual cycle will starts on the first day of your period bleed, right until the first day of your next period. An average cycle length is anywhere between 23 and 35 days in length and varies from woman to woman. Although the menstrual cycle based on 28 days, Now this is not the case always. Anything outside this 23-35 day cycle length will be considered abnormal or will often indicate a Hormonal Imbalance dysfunction along the line in life.

Hormonal Imbalance

 

There are many hormones involved in the body that can regulate the menstrual cycle, but (so it doesn’t get too confusing!) the main ones are:

  1. Estrogen
  2. Progesterone
  3. Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)
  4. Luteinizing hormone (LH)
  5. Testosterone

Testosterone and other androgens, If implantation of an egg occurs, the above hormones kick in to promote all the requirements for a healthy pregnancy. If fertilization does not happen, after ovulation the uterus lining will shed to make way for a new uterine lining for next ovulation (the body is always hoping!).

Ovulation is meant to occur smack-bang in the middle of your menstrual cycle- at text-book day 14 if you have a 28-day cycle. You will usually get your period 14 days later of ovulation, so if your menstrual cycle is 25 days, you may ovulate on day 11.

The Ovulation shares the menstrual period into two stages: the first phase is when estrogen is the star, and the second stage focuses on progesterone. Progesterone usually is secreted from the ovarian follicle after ovulation (a tiny bit released from your adrenal glands), which develops into a sac called the corpus luteum. Therefore, to have adequate levels of progesterone, you need to have ovulated.

Now, central to the discussion of hormonal balance because many women don’t ovulate every menstrual cycle due to stress, illness, and nutritional inadequacies. Estrogen and progesterone-like to work together in balance, and the ratio between the levels of these hormones is critical. Estrogen is ‘proliferative,’ meaning it promotes cells growth (things like breast and hip development in puberty) and promotes smooth, plump skin, healthy bones, and arteries. Progesterone is ‘secrete,’ meaning that it promotes vascular development and the maintenance of the uterine lining after ovulation.

Hormonal Imbalance

Hormonal Imbalance can occur in women when:

  1. Estrogen levels are high or low, and progesterone is normal
  2. Estrogen levels are high or low, and progesterone is low
  3. Estrogen levels are reasonable, and progesterone levels are low
  4. Pre-Menstrual, Acne, and Estrogen levels
  5. Pre-Menstrual, Acne, and Testosterone levels

Pre-menstrual and acne can occur anywhere in the 1-2 weeks before your period, now this acne is related to the hormonal of a woman’s menstrual period and includes the hormones testosterone, estrogen, progesterone also some androgens and others.

After the ovulation, in the second part of the menstrual cycle the amount of hormones increases, because we know we have testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone. Estrogen will naturally start to decline soon while progesterone begins to rise.

But how do estrogen levels drop?

Too high or too little estrogen can disrupt the menstrual cycle and can impact progesterone levels by impairing ovulation. So, we want estrogen to be at just the right amount- not too high and not too low. Estrogen is broken down (metabolized) through the liver and eliminated via the kidneys and intestines (in your pee and poop). If estrogen is not working or metabolized correctly, then the levels build and build which can result in estrogen excess. Too much estrogen and specific metabolites of estrogen can cause inflammation. Here is where high estrogen levels can trigger pre-menstrual acne.

The cause? Too much re-circulating estrogen and not enough proper liver detoxification going on and extra estrogen can turn in testosterone.

Pre-Menstrual and acne are a sign that your liver needs some love!

Higher amounts of hormones place a higher burden on the liver’s detoxification pathways in the body. Don’t forget! The liver has to metabolize every single thing or substance that enters into our bodies food, environmental toxins, metabolic waste products, red blood cells and much more. It also metabolizes our hormones, especially estrogen (and all the estrogen metabolites).

Some are signs that your liver needs some support or attention:

  1. Headaches and migraines
  2. Constipation
  3. Acne
  4. Eczema
  5. Irritability
  6. PMS
  7. Nausea and indigestion
  8. Sinus congestion (sinusitis, rhinitis)
  9. Allergies
  10. Metabolic syndrome
  11. Insulin resistance

How can you help your liver and make sure you’re eliminating excess hormones?

Make sure you’re pooping at least once per day. If your bowels are congested, this increases your overall toxic load, which has to get processed in the liver.

Eat enough fiber- we require at least 30 grams per day, and many of us reach about half of this. Thread connects into metabolized hormones, cholesterol and moves them out of the body via the intestines. Up your intake of veggies, seeds, beans, legumes, nuts and gluten-free grains.

Cruciferous vegetables contain glucosinolates, which are broken down to indole-3-carbinol. This compound supports the detoxification of estrogens. So eat more broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and kale every day.

Eat bitter foods- bitter greens like the rocket (arugula), endive and bitter lettuces stimulate the production of digestive secretions, such bile in the liver. Bile contains metabolized hormones and waste products, so we make sure it leaves the body, so the liver can continually process new fresh bile and help the organization.

Include rosemary and turmeric in your diet as much as possible. This help reduces inflammation in the body, liver and also support detoxification pathways or microbiota.

Make sure you don’t have any hidden food intolerances. These will cause the body inflammation in the GIT and place an extra burden on your liver.

Balance your gut bugs! Your microbiota (intestinal bacteria) also play a significant role in metabolizing of estrogens. Consume fermented foods with each meal: fermented veggies and kombucha, yogurts, kefir, sauerkraut, and feed your bugs with probiotic fibers: green bananas, cold potatoes, whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables.

Acne, Pre-Menstrual, and Progesterone testosterone, and estrogen

Now If your progesterone levels are out of balance, this can also lead to hormonal acne, as other symptoms related to PMS and infertility. Balance progesterone levels have been shown to help block the activity of DHT, and the most potent of androgens, also this present in the skin and contributes to the formation of acne.

We have discussed this earlier in this blog, progesterone mainly produced once ovulation has occurred. The egg released from a structure called the follicle, and once ovulation has occurred, the follicle forms the ‘corpus luteum,’ which is a secretory endocrine structure that produces most of our progesterone.

Progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen work together in a balanced ratio, and when this occurs there will be no more PMS symptoms, fertility will be optimal, and you will feel young. This Issues will arise when a woman fails to ovulate her self, or her body does not have the requirements to maintain and therefore her progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen levels are insufficient.

The reasons why women fail to ovulate and why?

High estrogen levels block the hormonal cascade that triggers ovulation, Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), Nutritional insufficiency, Low body fat percentage, Stress and Ovarian failure and menopause.

The Insufficient nutrients required to maintain the corpus luteum and produce hormones, Stress, and Inflammation

How can these issues be addressed and ensure we make and maintain progesterone?

We have to ensure to balance our nutritional intake in our body. The corpus luteum requires sufficient levels of magnesium, zinc, iron, B vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C and iron (for a start).

We also need fats to make our hormones, so it is vital to include healthy fats in your diet. Manage your stress! Stress responses burn through nutrients faster than anything else, so if you chronically stressed you would be depriving your reproductive system of the nutrients, it needs to perform. Stress also inhibits the HPOA axis (hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis). The hypothalamus (a master control center in your brain) needs to convinced that you are safe and nourishing for you to reproduce (which is the ultimate function of your reproductive system).

Acne can associate with insulin resistance and PCOS will primary be due to impaired glucose metabolism, so this is the critical area to address. Insulin promotes androgen production, which is a driving factor in the production of acne. Necessary but effective strategies to combat this include eliminating all refined and added sugar from your diet and eating more protein, fats and complex carbohydrates. Supplementing with chromium, magnesium and B vitamins will also support proper glucose metabolism and insulin function.

July 12, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 3 Comments

What does the Bioidentical Hormone 5 (1)

What Does the Bioidentical Hormone Program Involve

Bioidentical Hormone GHRP-2 is a synthetic analog of the peptide hormone ghrelin. Ghrelin is a small 28 amino acid peptide that is produced by the stomach in response to hunger. It also activates the human growth hormone secretagogue receptor (also known as the ghrelin receptor) to stimulate GH production and metabolism. GHRP-2 functions similarly to stimulate the hypothalamus and increase the production of endogenous GH from the pituitary gland; synthesis then slowly drops back to baseline by the third hour after administration. This more closely replicates the pulsatile nature of endogenous GH production, which makes it advantageous and potentially safer compared with synthetic HGH use.

(more…)

November 8, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 6 Comments

What are the Symptoms of Peri-menopause 5 (1)

What is the Peri-menopause?

As women, our bodies go through dramatic changes as we age, and these changes are caused by our hormones. Perimenopause is the time of a woman’s life when her hormonal cycle slows, her fertility reduces, and periods become less common as she heads toward menopause. It can be a very stressful time because it affects her physical and emotional state.

To understand what causes the peri-menopause and how to best reduce the symptoms, it is important to appreciate the changes that occur in the female body during aging. There are four main stages in a woman’s hormonal life:

Puberty

Puberty is the process of sexual maturation; it normally begins around the age of 11 and lasts for several years. Generally, it begins with breast development, followed by the growth of pubic hair and finally menstruation.

The Reproductive Years

The reproductive years begin with the onset of menstruation and persist until peri-menopause. They are characterized by the menstrual cycle, which controls a woman’s fertility. The menstrual cycle is primarily governed by fluctuations in the levels of the hormones that control ovulation and regulate the thickness of the uterine lining to prepare for the implantation of a possible fertilized egg.

  • The hypothalamus secretes gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).
  • FSH stimulates follicles in the ovaries to prepare an egg for maturation and release, which includes the secretion of estrogen to prepare the uterus for implantation.
  • LH triggers ovulation, or the release of an egg from the ovaries, which results in the production and release of progesterone and additional estrogen to prepare the body for fertilization and pregnancy [1].

Menopause

Perimenopause

Perimenopause occurs when a woman’s hormonal cycle transitions toward menopause and infertility begin. It often starts in women in their late-40’s and can last for up to 11 years; the average duration is ~4 years. During the peri-menopause, menses become less common and the symptoms typically associated with menopause (discussed below) begin.

The changes that occur during menopause are caused by altered hormone levels. A woman remains fertile only as long as her ovaries produce and secrete eggs via a process known as ovulation. Since there are a finite number of eggs, female fertility essentially has an expiration date. The production of estrogen and progesterone relies upon ovulation, which means that hormone production is diminished significantly once eggs are no longer released.

Hormonally, the peri-menopause is defined by persistently increased LH and FSH levels and very low estrogen and progesterone levels. Testosterone secretion can also decline by approximately 50% during peri-menopause [2].

Menopause

Menopause officially starts one year after a woman’s last period. Menopausal women produce very high levels of FSH but low levels of estrogen and progesterone. They are no longer fertile and are at a higher risk of diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease because of the reduced hormone concentrations [3].perimenopause

What are the Symptoms of Peri-Menopause?

The most common symptoms of peri-menopause (http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide-perimenopause#2) are:

  • Hot flashes
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Discomfort and dryness during sex
  • Fatigue
  • Problems sleeping
  • Mood swings
  • Migraines
  • Severe premenstrual syndrome
  • Irregular periods
  • Breast tenderness
  • An urgent need to urinate
  • Urine leakage, particularly when sneezing or coughing

Because some of these symptoms can be caused by other hormone-related conditions, we always recommend getting your hormone levels checked to ensure that you receive an accurate diagnosis. If you visit AAI Rejuvenation Clinic with the above symptoms, we will measure the levels of your sex hormones as part of our work up. This will allow us to develop a specific program to make you feel like your old self.

Alleviate Your Symptoms with Hormone-Replacement Therapy (HRT)

Unfortunately, the transition from fertility to menopause is part of natural aging and it happens to all women. Although the symptoms of perimenopause can be severe, it is possible to reduce their severity and be able to function fully.

For many years, HRT was used to alleviate the symptoms of peri-menopause and reduce the risk of mortality, dementia, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis in aging women. Although a now-revised link to an increased risk of breast cancer led to a temporary decline in the use of HRT, it is again the number one treatment and disease-prevention strategy used in peri-menopausal and menopausal women [4].

As the name suggests, the aim of HRT is to replace the hormones no longer being produced naturally. The hormones are often delivered in tablet form, although transdermal Testosterone Patches, creams, Testosterone Gels, and implants can also be used. There are four major forms of HRT:

  • Estrogen alone
  • Estrogen and progesterone
  • Gonadomimetics, which contain estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone; an example is a tibolone
  • SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators)

Because HRT can restore your hormone levels to those you experienced when you were young, it can relieve your symptoms and also reduce the risk of diseases associated with low hormone levels such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Although some studies have suggested that HRT could protect against stroke, diabetes, cognitive aging, and mood, these effects are more controversial [5]. Nevertheless, the clinical evidence supporting the beneficial effects of HRT in cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis is convincing:

  • HRT reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases. An evidence-based study investigated the evidence from randomized clinical trials and concluded that HRT could reduce the risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease in women within 10 years of the menopause aged <60 years [5]. However, there is evidence that HRT should be avoided in older women because it might increase the risk of coronary events [6].
  • HRT reduces the risk of osteoporosis. One of the best-known benefits of HRT is its ability to inhibit bone loss and reduce the incidence of fractures in perimenopausal women; estrogen therapy might be more effective than combined estrogen-progesterone treatment [7].

In addition to these clinical effects, HRT alleviates the symptoms of peri-menopause including skin and hair complaints and sexual symptoms [8], as well as hot flashes [9].

Measure your hormone levels today and find out if HRT could improve your day-to-day life.

References

  • [1] R.E. Jones, K.H. Lopez, Human reproductive biology, Academic Press2006.
  • [2] S.J. Richardson, The biological basis of the menopause, Bailliere’s clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 7 (1993) 1-16.
  • [3] L. Jia, H. Jin, J. Zhou, L. Chen, Y. Lu, Y. Ming, Y. Yu, A potential anti-tumor herbal medicine, Corilagin, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth through blocking the TGF-beta signaling pathways, BMC complementary, and alternative medicine, 13 (2013) 33.
  • [4] R.A. Lobo, J.H. Pickar, J.C. Stevenson, W.J. Mack, H.N. Hodis, Back to the future: Hormone replacement therapy as part of a prevention strategy for women at the onset of menopause, Atherosclerosis, 254 (2016) 282-290.
  • [5] R. Sood, S.S. Faubion, C.L. Kuhle, J.M. Thielen, L.T. Shuster, Prescribing menopausal hormone therapy: an evidence-based approach, International Journal of Women’s Health, 6 (2014) 47-57.
  • [6] R.A. Lobo, Where are we 10 years after the Women’s Health Initiative?, The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 98 (2013) 1771-1780.
  • [7] The 2012 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society, Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19 (2012) 257-271.
  • [8] D. Rouskova, K. Mittmann, U. Schumacher, H. Dietrich, T. Zimmermann, Effectiveness, tolerability and acceptance of an oral estradiol/levonorgestrel formulation for the treatment of menopausal complaints: a non-interventional observational study over six cycles of 28 days, Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 30 (2014) 712-716.
  • [9] N. Santoro, C.N. Epperson, S.B. Mathews, Menopausal Symptoms and Their Management, Endocrinology and metabolism clinics of North America, 44 (2015) 497-515.

February 16, 2016 by admin 3 Comments

Perimenopause in Women 5 (1)

perimenopause

Perimenopause: Hormone Imbalance in Women; discussing the three main hormones and their impact.

Perimenopause can easily sneak up on the unsuspecting woman. It’s a difficult truth but, our reality. It had been 2 years since I had last seen Suzy in my office. A pretty, vicarious mother of two teenage boys, I noticed, as I entered the room that she had added some weight to her midsection, and she was not her usual bubbly self. “Dr. Kauffman, I don’t know what is wrong with me! I am eating the same and exercising every day, but I keep gaining weight! She continued “ But that is the least of it, for the first time in my life, I have insomnia! And my poor husband, I have no sex drive!”.

I suggested to Suzy, that at 45, these symptoms suggested perimenopause. “But doctor, my periods are regular, they have even gotten a lot heavier lately.

I explained to Suzy that women have 3 main hormones that decrease during the transition into menopause; estrogen, testosterone, and progesterone. The first hormones that decrease are progesterone and testosterone, while estrogen levels remain fairly stable. This decrease typically starts in the early to mid forties, on setting the beginning stages of perimenopause.

With progesterone decreasing while estrogen remains the same, this creates a relative excess of estrogen sometimes referred to as “Estrogen Dominance”. This frequently is the reason for increasingly heavy periods experienced by women in their forties.

Women with low progesterone may experience symptoms such as;

*Insomnia _ trouble sleeping, waking up in the middle of the night

*Fuzzy Thinking” ­ misplacing keys, forgetting where the car is parked, feeling overwhelmed.

*Worsening PMS with heavier, more painful periods

*Headaches increasing in frequency, new onset migraines.

Testosterone is an important hormone for women as well as men. As a woman’s testosterone level declines in peri­menopause, she may experience symptoms such as;

Decreased libido

● Inability to orgasm

● decreased sense of well­being, energy, and sex drive

● dysphoria

The final hormone to decrease in perimenopause is estrogen. this occurs late in perimenopause, signaling the transition into early menopause. Symptoms of low estrogen can include:

● Hot Flashes

● Night Sweats

● Pain during intercourse

● Thinning, drooping skin

● Recurrent urinary tract infections

Women are grossly underrated in perimenopause. It is not uncommon for women to suffer for years. Left untreated, these hormonal imbalances can cause a great deal of stress to a woman’s life. It can damage one’s life emotionally, physically and mentally.

Fortunately, it is possible to replace the hormones that decrease during perimenopause and menopause. Just like someone suffering from hypothyroidism, women who are suffering from low estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone can have these hormones replaced. The first step is to schedule blood work so that you can be evaluated for hormonal deficiencies.

By Dr. Deborah Kauffman

 

September 21, 2015 by Joseph Fermin 1 Comment

Anti-Aging Answer for Women’s Health 5 (3)

AAI is the Anti-Aging Answer for Women’s Health

Women’s Health hormonal web is complicated; finding the right anti-aging serum can also be challenging. The hormones governing women’s physical and mental function throughout their lives work together to maintain a balance. The key hormonal players in women, Estrogen, Progesterone, Testosterone/DHEA, Human Growth Hormone, Thyroid, & Cortisol, begin to play out of tune as their levels decrease with age. So when hormones decline or become imbalanced, as in Peri-Menopause & Menopause, we start to notice changes in our bones, muscle strength, the elasticity of our skin, and in our energy, mood, memory, & libido. The majority of women think that Peri-Menopause and Menopause cause inconvenient symptoms: mood swings, fatigue, hot flashes, & low libido among others. What they don’t know is that these hormonal imbalances raise our risk for serious diseases such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis, obesity, depression, stroke, and cancers; especially breast cancer. Therefore, it is crucial that we prevent and treat the cause of these symptoms as soon as they start to appear in our late 30’s. Not only our well­ being and quality of life depends on it, but our health and risk of disease is optimized by becoming hormone balance.

The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI 2002) was a major multi-national study that included thousands of Women’s Health on synthetic estrogens (Premarin, Birth Control Pills, Nuvaring) and/or on synthetic progesterones (Provera, Progestins, Birth Control Pellets/Injections). This study had to be stopped abruptly: unprecedented for any medical study around the world. The reason was that Women’s Health in the study were getting a much higher incidence of heart disease, stroke, blood clots, and breast cancer than Women’s Health in the general population. At this point, 08/GYN’s around the country took Women’s Health off their synthetic hormonal therapy (synthetic estrogens and Peri-Menopause) to prevent these problems, even though they knew women would have to live with bothersome symptoms and their risk for serious illness would be greatly increased. Bio-Identical or Non-Synthetic hormonal therapy progesterones is the only option for women to treat Progesterone symptoms, decrease significantly the risk of age-related diseases, and increase well-being & quality of life. Most doctors are not familiar with the Bio-Identical hormonal therapy, but experts in Anti-aging Medicine specialize in this field.

Bio-Identical hormones are the answer!

Women’s reproductive life is composed of 3 stages:

  1. Pre Menopause – the PMS Years
  2. Peri-Menopause – the Rollercoaster Years
  3. Menopause/Post-Menopause -the End of Periods

Pre Menopause-The PMs Years

During their 20’s and 30’s, Women’s Health experience fairly regular cycles with balanced estrogen and progesterone production. But increasingly, younger females who are prone to excess stress, crash diets, and contraceptive use are not ovulating regularly. Anovulatory cycles can lead to symptoms of

hormonal imbalance, severe PMS, and more serious health issues, such as polycystic ovaries, endometriosis, and infertility.

Peri-Menopause – The Rollercoaster Years

Most women don’t know that there is a period of time called Peri-Menopause {of 10-15 years) when the body gets ready to start Menopause, therefore, they do not associate mood and emotional symptoms with their hormones or menopause. But they should! Beginning in the late 30’s until menopause (average age of 51), Women’s Health begins to experience a whole new world of symptoms, as estrogen and progesterone levels fluctuate dozens of times a day from wavering ovarian function. These symptoms range from classical menopause symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, and mood swings to not so typical ones like high anxiety, foggy thinking, bone loss, weight gain, depression, fatigue, and low libido. These fluctuations in hormone levels take women on a rollercoaster ride! At this point, the search for symptom relief begins with Bio-Identical hormones.

Menopause/Post Menopause- The Ends of Periods

The official start of Menopause is 12 months in a row without a period, occurring around age 51. But it is not uncommon to see symptoms much sooner. Acute/prolonged stress, for example, can negatively impact ovarian function and can precipitate premature Menopause in vulnerable women as early as their mid to late 30’s. Menopause can also be surgically induced through hysterectomy, radiation, or chemotherapy. We think that hormones control only our sexual and reproductive systems, but hormones actually regulate the entire body. With fewer hormones to go around, their important role in protecting the health of the brain, bones, muscles, skin, breasts, and heart is diminished.

Supplementation with Bio-Identical hormones is a matter of life or death at this stage.

Common hormone imbalances in Peri-Menopause & Menopause:

The right balance of anti-aging serum and hormones is vital to a woman’s health & well being. During Peri-Menopause & Menopause, hormone levels drop and hormone deficiencies take place. Logically, one would think that hormonal deficiencies should be resolved with hormonal supplementation. Unfortunately, there are so many hormones at work in a woman’s body that deficiencies in one hormone may trigger excesses of either hormone and this is how imbalances take place. (Remember, low levels of hormone are as harmful to your health as high levels). The following are the most common hormone imbalances in Women’s Health and their symptoms:

  1. Estrogen Dominance–mood swings, migraines, fat gain, low thyroid, breast cancer risk
  2. Low Estrogen & Progesterone-hot flashes, night sweats, palpitations, foggy thinking
  3. High Testosterone & DHEA-acne, hair loss, irritability, belly fat, polycystic ovaries
  4. Low Testosterone & DHEA-decreases bone/muscle mass, energy, libido (sexual desire)
  5. High or Low Cortisol  (Stressed Adrenals): insomnia, anxiety, chronic fatigue, allergies, food cravings, low immunity

Do you have symptoms of hormonal imbalance?

Mood Swings
Cold Body Temperature
Scalp Hair Loss
Memory Lapses
Incontinence
Sleep Disturbances
Stress
Can’t Lose Weight
Thinning Skin
Fatigue
Bone Loss
Uterine Fibroids
Hot Flashes
Sugar or Salty Cravings
Aches & Pains
Decreased Libido
Tender Breasts
Weight Gain (waist &/or hips)
Heart Palpitations
Fibrocystic Breasts
Fibromyalgia
Headaches
irritable
Polycystic Ovaries
Night Sweats
Oily Skin
Increased Body /Facial Hair
Vaginal Dryness
Heavy Menses/Bleeding Changes
Foggy Thinking
Anxious
Water Retention
Nervous
Depression
Foggy Thinking
Tearful

Troublesome or persistent symptoms during Peri-Menopause & Menopause are a sign of related imbalances that may be complicating the situation and raising disease risks of osteoporosis, heart disease, breast cancer, obesity, and Alzheimer’s.   Symptoms from one Women’s Health to another are as highly individual as a thumbprint! If you answered yes to 3 or more symptoms in this questionnaire, you may be hormonally imbalanced:

How can I balance my hormones naturally?

Hormone balance and the knowledge that hormones work together with a healthy mind and body are the keys to optimal health and Peri-Menopause & Menopausal relief.

  1. First, determine your symptoms
  2. Then, test ALL of your hormones to detect specific imbalances
  3. Find a board certified doctor in Anti-Aging Medicine (specializing in Bio-Identical hormonal therapy)
  4. NEVER use Estrogen alone (even after Hysterectomy)!
  5. ALWAYS use Bio-Identical hormones (the exact chemical structure as the hormones produced by the body and derived from a natural source)
  6. STOP all synthetic hormones-Premarin, Provera, Progestins, and birth control pills, pellets, injections, & intrauterine devices (They ALL contain synthetic hormones)
  7. Supplement with Nutriceuticals (pharmaceutical-grade nutritional supplements that are prescription strength, free of harmful contaminants, and actually absorbed by the body)-only way to have the available building blocks to regenerate the body’s tissues and to work properly
  8. Detoxify is key for Bio-Identical hormone treatment to work at its best
  9. Limit “Xenoestrogens” (substances that mimic estrogen in the body & precipitate hormonal imbalances)–for example, pesticides, nail polish, fumes,
  10. Use “hormone-free” foods and products
  11. Maintain ideal weight (fat cells send signals in the body that cause hormonal It is medically proven that overweight/obesity is a major risk factor for the major killers in the US: heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Also, breast cancer patients have a significant increase in fat mass compared to women without cancer)
  12. Boost hormones naturally with exercise not a substitute for hormonal supplementation with Bio-Identical hormones; exercise makes hormonal therapy more work at its best while becoming more stable
  13. Minimize stress and use stress-handling techniques like yoga, meditation, prayer,
  14. Stop smoking ASAP
  15. Eat more fiber
  16. Get deep, restful, uninterrupted 7-8 hours of sleep this is the only way that body tissues regenerate after being used during the day

**NOTE**  The content contained in this blog is subject to interpretation and is the opinion of the content writer.  We do not claim it to be fact.  We encourage you to consult a medical doctor before taking any prescribed medications or supplements.