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March 5, 2019 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

What is Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)? 5 (8)

What is Follicle Stimulating Hormone

What is Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), is one of the gonadotrophic hormones, and the other being a Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The pituitary gland releases both into the bloodstream and body, and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is one of the hormones essential for the development function of women’s ovaries and men’s testes. In women, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) stimulates the growth in the ovary before the release of an egg from one follicle to the ovulation. It also increases estradiol production. In men, Stimulating Follicle Hormone (FSH) acts on the Sertoli cells of the testes to stimulate sperm production (spermatogenesis).

How is Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) control?

The release of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is regulated by the levels of some circulating hormones released by the ovaries and testes. This system is called the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone is published in the hypothalamus and the receptors in the anterior pituitary gland to stimulate both the synthesis release of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The released Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is carried in the bloodstream, where it binds to receptors in the testes and the ovaries. Using this mechanism Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), along with Luteinizing Hormone (LH), can control the functions of the ovaries and testes.

follicle stimulating hormone

In women, when hormone levels are deficient, and it has complication the menstrual cycle, this is sensed by nerve cells in the hypothalamus. These cells produce the more gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, which in turn stimulates the pituitary gland to produce more Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH), and release these into the bloodstream. The rise in Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and stimulates the growth of the follicle in the ovary, and the cells of the follicles produce increasing amounts of estradiol. In turn, this production of these hormones is sensed by the hypothalamus, and pituitary gland and less gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) will be released, However, as the follicle grows, and more and more estrogen is produced from the follicles, it simulates a surge in luteinizing hormone (LH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), which stimulates the released egg from a mature follicle – ovary.

During women menstrual cycle, there is a rise the Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) secretion in the first half of the period and stimulates follicular growth in the ovary, after ovulation, each month the ruptured follicle forms and Corpus luteum that produces high levels of progesterone. This inhibits the release of stimulating Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), and towards the end of the cycle the Corpus luteum breaks down, and progesterone production decreases. The next menstrual period begins when Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) starts the production again, and get back to normal…

follicle stimulating hormone

Now In men, the production of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is regulated by levels of testosterone and inhibin, both produced by the testes. Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) regulates testosterone levels and when this rise they are sensed by nerve cells in the hypothalamus so that gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and consequently Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is decreased. The opposite occurs when testosterone levels drop. This is known as a ‘Negative Feedback in the body’ control so that the production of testosterone remains steady. But the sensed by cells in the anterior pituitary gland rather than the hypothalamus.

What happens if you have too much Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)?

Most often, and raised levels of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) are a sign of malfunction in the ovary or testis. If the gonads fail to create enough estrogen, testosterone and inhibit, the right feedback control of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) production from the pituitary gland is lost, and the levels of both Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) will rise. This condition is called hypogonadotropic-hypogonadism and is associated with primary ovarian failure or testicular failure. This is seen in states such as Klinefelter’s syndrome in men and Turner syndrome in women.

In women, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) levels also start to rise naturally in women around the menopausal period, reflecting a reduction in the function of the ovaries and decline of estrogen and progesterone production.

There are rare pituitary conditions that can raise the levels of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) in the bloodstream. This overwhelms the regular negative feedback and can cause ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in women ovaries.

Symptoms: This includes enlarging of the ovaries and potentially dangerous accumulation of fluid in the abdomen, and triggered the rise in ovarian steroid output. Which leads to pain and other problems in the pelvic area of the body.

What happens if don’t produce enough Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)?

In women, lack of Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) leads to incomplete development in puberty o poor ovarian function (ovarian failure), and In this situation ovarian follicles do not grow properly and do not release in the egg, thus leading to infertility. Since levels of Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) in the bloodstream are low, this condition is called hypogonadotropic-hypogonadism. This condition is called Kallman’s syndrome, which is associated with a reduced sense of smell.

Sufficient Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH), this action is also needed for proper sperm production in men, in case of complete absence of Follicle Stimulating in men, and the lack of puberty and infertility due no production of sperm is called (azoospermia). Partial Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) deficiency in young men, can also cause delayed puberty and low sperm production, called (oligozoospermia), but fathering a child may still be possible. Follicle-Stimulating-Hormone (FSH) occurs after puberty; there will be a similar loss of fertility…

February 28, 2018 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

Roasted Pepper Avocado Soup, Help Boost Testosterone 5 (3)

Roasted Pepper Avocado Soup and

The Benefits of Cholesterol and Testosterone

Roasted Pepper Avocado Soup, This Creamy avocado dish, and slow-cooked peppers make a delicious combination in this rich, velvety soup. Serve it right out of the slow cooker or refrigerate and serve cold.

Avocados contain a right amount of monounsaturated fats (MUFA) which in turn raises the level of HDL (good) cholesterol. Good cholesterol is vital for the production of testosterone, which is why you instantly feel a “testosterone rush” after feasting on a serving of avocado. Turmeric is also potent, and as I have mentioned in this article, inflammation can negatively affect the Leydig cell functioning in the testes and reduce the production of testosterone. But by lowering inflammation in the body, turmeric can help increase testosterone production in the body.

Nutritional Bonus for the roasted pepper avocado soup: Bell peppers are among the best sources of vitamin C, a water-soluble vitamin with immune-boosting and antioxidant effects.

  • DURATION
  • COOK TIME
  • PREP TIME
  • SERVINGS

Ingredients for roasted pepper avocado soup

  • 1 tbsp safflower oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups diced yellow onion
  • 4 poblano chile peppers, seeded and quartered
  • 2 yellow bell peppers, seeded and quartered
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 avocado, pitted, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 3 cups skim milk
  • 3/4 tsp sea salt
  • 2/3 cup low-fat sour cream
  • 1 large lime, cut into wedges

RELISH:

  • 1 poblano chile pepper, seeded and finely chopped
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1/8 tsp sea salt

Preparation

  1. In a large nonstick skillet over medium-high, heat 1 tsp oil. Add onion and cook until very browned about 8 minutes. Transfer to a 4- to 6-qt slow cooker.
  2. To slow cooker, add 4 poblano peppers, bell peppers, garlic, chili powder, cumin and remaining 2 tsp oil. Stir well, cover and cook on low for 7 hours (or on high for 3 1/2 hours).
  3. Transfer pepper mixture to a blender along with avocado; puree until smooth. (Remove plastic lid in cover and cover the top with a kitchen towel to allow steam to escape.) Return to slow cooker and stir in milk and salt. (If necessary, cover and cook on high for 15 minutes more to reheat.)
  4. In a small bowl, combine relish ingredients. Divide soup among serving bowls and top with relish, sour cream, and lime wedges.

Nutrition Information

  • Serving Size: 1 cup soup, 1/3 cup topping, 2 tbsp sour cream
  • Calories: 281
  • Carbohydrate Content: 34 g
  • Cholesterol Content: 19 mg
  • Fat Content: 13 g
  • Fiber Content: 7 g
  • Protein Content: 9 g
  • Saturated Fat Content: 3 g
  • Sodium Content: 458 mg
  • Sugar Content: 15 g

 

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October 30, 2017 by Joseph Fermin 0 Comments

Understanding Your Cholesterol 5 (1)

Understanding Your Cholesterol

Fix heart disease, X Understanding your Cholesterol

Understanding your Cholesterol is essential for the body’s metabolic processes, including hormone’s and bile production, and to help the body with vitamin D. But, unmanaged levels of bad cholesterol can lead to clogged arteries and increase the odds of getting a stroke or heart attack.

In fact, stroke and heart disease is the number one cause of death for men and women in the U.S. More than a million people in the U.S have heart attacks and stroke every year, and about a half million people die from stroke and heart disease. Most of the population don’t understand what cholesterol is and how it works, that there good cholesterol and bad cholesterol that your body control.

Cholesterol is produced by the liver & also made by more of the cells in the body, and blood carries it by small couriers called by doctors “Lipoprotein.”

One of the reasons that the body need cholesterol in the blood is:

• Build the structure of cells membrane
• Make hormones like testosterone, estrogen, adrenaline and more
• Help your metabolism work efficiently; example, cholesterol is essential to produce vitamin D in your body
• By produce bile acids, which help the body digest fat and absorb vital nutrients.

There are two types of cholesterol :

1. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol – called the ‘bad’ cholesterol because it goes into the bloodstream and clogs up your arteries.
2. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol – called the ‘good’ cholesterol because it helps to take the ‘bad’ cholesterol out of the bloodstream.

How Does Cholesterol Cause Heart Disease and Stroke?

When there is too much cholesterol (a fat-like substance) in your blood, it builds up in your arteries. Over time, this buildup causes
‘arteries’ and blood flow to the heart is blocked and slowed down. So blood carries oxygen, and if oxygen reaches the center, you may suffer chest pain.

Understanding your Cholesterol Cholesterol Numbers?

Everyone age 20 or older should measure their cholesterol at least once every five years. This blood test is done after a 9- to 12-hour fast and gives information about your:

• Total cholesterol. Less than 200 mg/dL is best
• LDL (bad) cholesterol – LDL should be less than 100mg/dL
• HDL (good) cholesterol – HDL should be more than 40mg/dL

Diet tips to help reduce your cholesterol. You should try to:

• Limit the number of cholesterol-rich foods
• Increase the amount and variety of wholegrain, fresh fruit, and vegetables
• Choose low or reduced fat milk, yogurt, and have ‘added calcium’ soy drinks other dairy products
• Choose lean meat, (labeled as ‘meat trimmed of fat’)
• Limit fatty meat, choose leaner sandwich meats like turkey breast and cooked lean chicken including sausages and salami
• Have fish at least twice a week
• Replace butter and dairy blends with margarine
• Include rich foods insoluble fiber and healthy fats, such as nuts
• Limit cheese and ice cream
• Consider a supplement to regulate cholesterol and Exercise

For some people, diet is a lifestyle change.

October 25, 2016 by Joseph Fermin 3 Comments

Turmeric Health Benefits 5 (1)

Turmeric and The Health Benefits

Turmeric, Several plants, and their extracts have been reported to have health benefits, and it can be difficult to know what is true. Are all these things as good as they seem? For turmeric, the answer is a resounding yes!

Turmeric is an herbal plant grown in Asia. The roots are used to make the yellow spice turmeric, which is most commonly used in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and Iranian cooking. It is the main spice in curries and is also used to color cheese and butter.

Although the health benefits of turmeric have been known for thousands of years in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, it has only recently been appreciated in Western medicine. Curcumin is a phenolic curcuminoid that is thought to be responsible for many of the health benefits of turmeric. It has potent and well-characterized antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Read on to learn more about the other ways in which this amazing spice can boost your health.

turmeric

 

Anticancer effects

Cancer development is a highly complex process that involves DNA damage, inflammation, and the disruption of cellular signaling and death pathways. Although the data are preliminary, there is a certain amount of excitement in the oncology community because curcumin can affect several of these pathways to exert anticancer effects.

Specific clinical trials in patients with cancer are ongoing, but the available results suggest that curcumin could be an effective treatment for multiple cancers, including multiple myeloma, head, and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and pancreatic, prostate, breast, colorectal, lung, and oral cancers [1].

 

Cognitive function

An exciting recent discovery is that turmeric could improve cognitive function in elderly individuals. An Australian study published in April 2016 administered placebo control or a form of curcumin to 96 community-dwelling older adults for 1 year. Various cognitive functions were tested before treatment and at 6- and 12-months. Subjects that received placebo exhibited a cognitive decline at 6 months, whereas those that received curcumin did not [2].

Although the Australian study was not definitive, the available data suggest that curcumin could have several anti-Alzheimer’s disease effects such as preventing the production and aggregation of β-amyloid in the brain and also regenerating brain cells [3]. Taken together, these data suggest that the regular intake of turmeric might reduce the aging-associated decline in cognitive function.

 brain-and-boosts

 

Increase testosterone levels

As anyone reading this blog understands, declining testosterone levels during normal aging are associated with several negative effects on health. Recent research has suggested that turmeric might increase testosterone levels in different ways. First, it can help reverse a number of conditions that can contribute to reduced low testosterone production, such as high cholesterol and dysregulated blood sugar.

The anti-oxidative effects of turmeric can also prevent oxidative damage to Leydig cells in the testis, which could, in turn, normalize with testosterone injections. In mice, turmeric could improve fertility by protecting the testes from various stressors [4, 5].

Who knew that eating curry could improve your testosterone levels and fertility!

 

Metabolic diseases

Curcumin exhibits a seemingly endless number of beneficial metabolic effects. For example:

  • It can increase the levels of HDL or good cholesterol and lower the levels of LDL or bad cholesterol [6]. This is important because low HDL levels and high LDL levels are risk factors for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.
  • It reduces blood glucose levels and improves glucose metabolism in rodent models, suggesting that it could be an effective treatment for diabetes [7].

 

How to make the most of your turmeric intake

Now you know about just some of the health benefits of turmeric, it is important to understand how to make the most of it. As with all drugs or supplements, the actions of turmeric are limited by its bioavailability, which is defined as the amount that is biologically available to exert its physiological effects. The bioavailability of a drug declines as it is metabolized in the liver, which is a particular concern with any drug or supplement that is administered orally.

One of the best ways to increase the bioavailability of curcumin is to consume turmeric-rich foods with black pepper. Black pepper contains a substance named piperine, which is a potent inhibitor of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (one of the liver enzymes responsible for drug metabolism) [8]. Indeed, eating even a small amount of piperine with turmeric could increase the bioavailability of turmeric by around 2000% [9].

Curcumin absorption can also be enhanced by consuming turmeric with fats because turmeric is fat-soluble. There are two ways to achieve this: ingest turmeric powder with a healthy fat such as olive oil, or consume natural turmeric root, which contains natural oils that promote its solubility.

Testosterone Injections – Curious about testosterone injections Therapy? Read more about what you can expect from this treatment and contact us for more information (866) 224-5698

References

  1. Gupta, S.C., S. Patchva, and B.B. Aggarwal, Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials. The AAPS Journal, 2013. 15(1): p. 195-218.
  2. Rainey-Smith, S.R., et al., Curcumin and cognition: a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of community-dwelling older adults. British Journal of Nutrition, 2016. 115(12): p. 2106-2113.
  3. Goozee, K.G., et al., Examining the potential clinical value of curcumin in the prevention and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Br J Nutr, 2016. 115(3): p. 449-65.
  4. Lin, C., et al., Curcumin dose-dependently improves spermatogenic disorders induced by scrotal heat stress in mice. Food Funct, 2015. 6(12): p. 3770-7.
  5. Coskun, G., et al., Ameliorating effects of curcumin on nicotine-induced mice testes. Turk J Med Sci, 2016. 46(2): p. 549-60.
  6. Yang, Y.S., et al., Lipid-lowering effects of curcumin in patients with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Phytother Res, 2014. 28(12): p. 1770-7.
  7. Nabavi, S.F., et al., Curcumin: a natural product for diabetes and its complications. Curr Top Med Chem, 2015. 15(23): p. 2445-55.
  8. Grill, A.E., B. Koniar, and J. Panyam, Co-delivery of natural metabolic inhibitors in a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of curcumin. Drug Deliv Transl Res, 2014. 4(4): p. 344-52.
  9. Shoba, G., et al., Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Planta Med, 1998. 64(4): p. 353-6.

June 27, 2015 by Joseph Fermin 3 Comments

Erectile Dysfunction and Hormones Issues In Men 5 (2)

Erectile Dysfunction and
Hormones Issues In Men

Erectile Dysfunction can be a sign of a physical or hormone condition. It can cause stress, relationship strain, and low self-confidence.

The main symptom is a man’s inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. Patients suffering from erectile dysfunction should first be evaluated for any underlying physical and psychological conditions.

The Danger of Low Testosterone, Risks Associated with Low hGH in Men, HGH Side Effects, What Causes Low Testosterone, testosterone therapy preventive medicine

Human Growth Hormone (HGH Therapy) has been used to reverse or correct issues of erectile dysfunction and other sexually impending disorders:

  • At the cellular level, HGH Therapy increases protein synthesis and cell division involved in the regrowth of organs.
  • On the tissue level, HGH Therapy increases nitrogen retention which builds muscle mass.
  • On the hormonal level, HGH provides direct feedback between the pituitary hormones and the gonadal normal hormones of the ovaries and testes.
  • On the systemic level, The Human Growth hormone improves cardiac function and circulation of blood to all parts of the body. When more blood is pumped into the penis, erections are firmer and can be sustained longer.
  • Taking HGH is enough to bring testosterone levels to normal in many men.
  • HGH therapy improves the effect of reproductive hormones in the production of sperm and eggs.
  • HGH sensitizes nerve endings, providing more pleasure.
  • The Growth hormone increases HDL-cholesterol. Studies suggest raising the level of HDL cholesterol escalates the likelihood of an erection, possibly by increasing peripheral circulation via the plaque removing properties of HDL.
  • The growth hormone accelerates the repair of tiny tears in the penis from trauma during intercourse, bike riding, or similar activities.

testosterone injections therapy

Testosterone Therapy Improves Sexual Interest In Older Men, the Older men with low libido and low testosterone levels showed more interest in sex and engaged in more sexual activity when they underwent testosterone therapy, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The study of Testosterone Therapy Improves Sexual Interests the most significant placebo-trial in older men conducted. The sexual function study is part of the Testosterone Injections Trials, a series of seven studies examining the effectiveness of testosterone therapy in men who are 65 or older, who have low testosterone levels and are experiencing symptoms of low testosterone deficiency. The research is supported primarily by the National Institutes of Health.

Testosterone is an essential male sex hormone help in maintaining Libido, sex drive, erectile function, and sperm production, and much more. The Endocrine Society’s Clinical Practice Guideline recommends using testosterone therapy to treat men with symptoms of androgen deficiency and low testosterone levels.

In the past 50 years, the use of injectable testosterone therapy has rapidly expanded among men population. Testosterone levels decline as men age, as early as 30 years old and some men develop low testosterone symptoms.

The placebo-controlled effect and double-blinded trial examined the effect of injectable testosterone therapy on sexual function in a group of 470 men. The men were in the study through 12 academic medical control centers. The participants were at least 65 years old and older, with low testosterone levels, based on the average results of multiple tests.

Testosterone Therapy Improves Sexual Interest, The men treated with injectable testosterone therapy displayed consistent improvement in libido and 10 of the 12 sexual activity measurements, nighttime erections, masturbation, and including frequency of intercourse. In comparison, men who received the placebo testosterone did not change their responses over the year-long medical study done.

Here at AAI Rejuvenation Clinic, we’re ready to help. Our services are discrete and confidential. Contact us today or fill out our medical history form Our trained wellness team is eager to get you started on the path to a more satisfied, more confident you.

At AAI Rejuvenation Clinic, we advise anyone to think seriously about beginning Hormone treatment if there is no medical need for it. However, we will take every precaution to ensure that you read all the positive benefits from your program by providing the latest at-home hormonal mouth-swab testing. This will ensure we are continually monitoring your progress and aware of any negative side effects. Fill out the Medical History Form or call us at (866) 224-5698

**NOTE**  The content contained in this blog is subject to interpretation and is the opinion of the content writer.  We do not claim it to be fact.  We encourage you to consult a medical doctor before taking any prescribed medications or supplements.